Singer Martha Wainwright thanks NHS for saving premature baby

Singer Martha Wainwright thanked NHS medics today for saving her premature baby's life.

The Canadian musician's son Arcangelo was born nine weeks early on November 16, hours after she performed a gig in London.



Wainwright said she and husband Brad Albetta would always have a link with the capital through their son and praised neonatal staff at University College Hospital.



"Brad and I want to thank the doctors and nursing staff at the hospital from the bottom of our hearts," she said.



"We had a special arrival who will always be connected to this city and to this country and we are incredibly grateful for the treatment that we received.



"We will never forget this time and it will always be a story we will tell people for the rest of our lives."



The singer had been planning a home birth in the US when her waters broke when she was seven months pregnant and she was rushed to hospital.



Arcangelo was born by emergency Caesarean, weighing just 3lb 5oz, and was in an incubator until December 8.



But Wainwright, 33, said that thanks to the care and expertise of staff at the unit, her first child was now thriving.



She said: "The doctors and nurses at the hospital certainly saved Arcangelo's life.



"I was supposed to be on a plane the next morning and Brad was supposed to be on a plane going to a different place.



"We were lucky I went into labour when I did because otherwise he would not have survived.



"It's thanks to the expertise of people at this hospital that he has thrived."



She said staff helped her and Albetta deal with the needs of a premature baby.



"Because he was premature he is more sensitive to sights and sounds and everything needs to be done at a much slower pace," she said.



"The sensitivity to the baby's needs has been obvious.



"Whether it's how to change the diaper, how to dress him, how to hold him and eventually how to breast feed, all of this would have been a scary experience but having the support of experts here has been invaluable."



The new parents said they had met "inspirational" people on the "remarkable" unit and praised the NHS, saying: "People living under a public health system will have a tendency to complain about it.



"But when you are in it and you really need it, that system comes through for you.



"There's a deep understanding here that the first priority is the patient and that is obvious in the quality of care we have received."



As a thank you for Arcangelo's care, Wainwright invited 14 members of staff, and some parents, to her recent gig at the Royal Albert Hall.



A Wainwright Family Christmas included performances by her brother Rufus and mother Kate McGarrigle.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

Ashdown Group: HR Manager - West London - £50,000

£40000 - £50000 per annum + bonus: Ashdown Group: HR Manager - West London - £...

Recruitment Genius: Recruitment & HR Administrator

£17000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Guru Careers: HR Manager / HR Business Partner

£55 - 65k (DOE) + Benefits: Guru Careers: A HR Manager / HR Business Partner i...

Recruitment Genius: Senior HR Assistant

£23000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: The Company's vision is to be t...

Day In a Page

Seifeddine Rezgui: What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?

Making of a killer

What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?
Ajmer: The ancient Indian metropolis chosen to be a 'smart city' where residents would just be happy to have power and running water

Residents just want water and power in a city chosen to be a ‘smart’ metropolis

The Indian Government has launched an ambitious plan to transform 100 of its crumbling cities
How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth: Would people co-operate to face down a global peril?

How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth

Would people cooperate to face a global peril?
Just one day to find €1.6bn: Greece edges nearer euro exit

One day to find €1.6bn

Greece is edging inexorably towards an exit from the euro
New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could become reality

Holographic projections would provide extra information on objects in a person's visual field in real time
Sugary drinks 'are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year'

Sugary drinks are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year

The drinks that should be eliminated from people's diets
Pride of Place: Historians map out untold LGBT histories of locations throughout UK

Historians map out untold LGBT histories

Public are being asked to help improve the map
Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

This was the year of 24-carat Golden Oldies
Paris Fashion Week

Paris Fashion Week

Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
A year of the caliphate:

Isis, a year of the caliphate

Who can defeat the so-called 'Islamic State' – and how?
Marks and Spencer: Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?

Marks and Spencer

Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?
'We haven't invaded France': Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak

'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

They’re here to help

We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?