The Business On... Edward Bonham Carter, CEO, Jupiter Fund Management


That's a famous name

It is, though one imagines that a bloke who is widely regarded as one of the stars of the City gets a little cheesed off with the endless references to the fact he is the elder brother of the actress Helena Bonham Carter.



You can't choose your family

Quite, and the Jupiter boss has quite an impressive set of relations. Forget Helena, he's also the great-grandson of the former Liberal Prime Minister Lord Asquith and the grandson of Eduardo Propper de Callejón, a Second World War hero who saved hundreds of Jews from Nazi concentration camps.



So what's he up to just now?

Well, it's a tough time for the City, what with fears about a second financial crisis emanating from Europe. But Bonham Carter managed yesterday to get Jupiter's £750m stock market flotation away without any last-minute hitches.



Time to crack open the bubbly?

Possibly. Bonham Carter sold shares worth around £3.5m in the float, which values his remaining stake at £26m. Other fund managers and directors will share £33m, though that has prompted concerns that key investment professionals might now feel tempted to quit the business.



What about Bonham Carter?

He looks well-set for the long haul and claims, in any case, not to be motivated by money. Having spent the best part of 30 years in the City, he's presumably not short of a bob or two, but seems to relish the stresses of the job. A weekly yoga session with the family helps.



A touch of Hollywood after all?

Hardly, everyone's into yoga these days. And Bonham Carter is distinctly unstarry – he still cycles to Jupiter's office in West London from his Barnes home each morning.



He's quite the sportsman

You haven't heard the half of it – Jupiter's chief executive is also a mean table tennis player. The game "steadies the nerve" and "improves your reactions" apparently. There's even a table in the office.

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