Turf mourns jockey, journalist and 'gentleman' Lord Oaksey

 

Racing and its associated worlds were for once united yesterday, though for the saddest of reasons. John Oaksey – sometime amateur jockey, journalist, author, broadcaster, public speaker and charity worker – died at the age of 83, after a long period of ill health. And though his death at his Wiltshire home was, at the end, a release from suffering, his passing will be regretted by all who knew, or even knew of, him.

The 2nd Baron Oaksey was one of the sport's most universally respected and well-loved figures. He was born (as John Lawrence) into a silver-spoon life and was a high achiever in all he did, but he was also a genuinely kind person, with no side to him and time for anyone who asked, who became an inspiration in so many fields. "He was," said perennial champion jump jockey Tony McCoy, "a truly great gentleman."

Oaksey was educated at Eton, Oxford and Yale, where he started studying to follow in the footsteps of his eminent lawyer father. But the opportunity to take up racing journalism arose and he joined The Daily Telegraph in 1957. Parallel with his writing, which later led to television work with ITV and Channel 4, he rode as a successful amateur jump jockey.

His best victories came on the high-class chaser Taxidermist in the Whitbread and Hennessy Gold Cups in 1958, the last-named a race he took last year as owner-breeder with Carruthers. He also won several times at the Cheltenham Festival, and finished a heartbreakingly close second on Carrickbeg in the 1963 Grand National, caught in the last strides by Ayala. In all, he won more than 200 races before injuries sustained in a fall in 1975 forced his retirement.

He was more effective than stylish in the saddle, but was both when his tools were words. He was one of the finest of all racing journalists, one to whom the work came with a seeming rare blithe ease. But a greater legacy to the sport came through his founding of the Injured Jockeys' Fund.

Always aware of the risks faced by race-riders, Oaksey's desire to do something about the sport's lack of back-up for the injured became focused in 1964, when Tim Brookshaw and Paddy Farrell both broke their backs in falls.

He created the immediately successful Farrell-Brookshaw Fund, which eventually became the IJF and has helped more than 1,000 jockeys. One of its latest residential rehabilitation developments is Oaksey House in Lambourn.

Oaksey, awarded the OBE in 1985 for his charity services, was last winter still a regular presence on racecourses selling the fund's Christmas cards alongside his wife, Chicky.

Turf account

Chris McGrath's Nap

Calaf (4.10 Haydock) A creditable fifth in testing conditions in a much better race last time. Will appreciate the drop in class and better ground.

Next best

Jadanna (3.15 Salisbury) Better than her placing suggests against some smart colts at Goodwood last time.

One to watch

Titled Gent (Brian Meehan) Won his nursery with any amount in hand and has the size, scope and pedigree to take his obvious progress to a higher level.

Where the money's going

Danadana and Chil The Kite have been installed 14-1 joint favourites for the Cambridgeshire by the sponsors Betfred.

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