Pandora: A Labour of love for film-maker Chadha

With the notable exception of a retired Dr Who (quiet at the back, Mr Tennant) the Labour Party has, thus far, been rather short of A-list supporters for its election campaign. While the Tories wheel out Sir Michael Caine and Carol Vorderman and the Liberal Democrats boast Daniel Radcliffe and Colin Firth, Labour has been left out in the cold, or so it seems.

But we have good news. Pandora has managed to track down a fan. Namely, the esteemed film-maker and writer Gurinder Chadha. "I am absolutely a Gordon and Sarah supporter," insisted Chadha at the premiere of her flick, A Wonderful Afterlife. "Britain is a country that is very diverse and able to be tolerant of lots of different cultures and cultural influences. You know it's vibrant, and I think Gordon Brown would agree."

In 2008, Pandora reported that Chadha, then due to direct a film adaptation of the TV series Dallas, had decided instead to focus her energies on the UK. Things, however, have changed. "I'm writing a film about events leading to Gandhi's assassination," she tells us.

So who is to be the new Ben Kingsley? "The problem is that in the time our film is set, the characters are quite old. Gandhi was 84 during that period, though we don't need to cast someone that elderly – there is something called hair and make-up!"

For once, there's no money for Moss

After two decades of modelling, the fashion world's demand for Kate Moss has yet to drop off. The interview-shy supermodel currently graces the billboards of, among others, Cavalli, Longchamp and, naturally, Topshop. Alas, the same cannot be said of the art world. We hear that Les Arts Décoratifs, a not-for-profit museum in Paris, has announced plans to pull its exhibition "The Kate Moss Myth" after no one offered to stump up the necessary cash. "Cultural patronage is not a priority for companies," explains a spokesman. Pity!

Birt shimmies back to the mosh-pit

A curious sight greeted those at Joan Armatrading's Royal Albert Hall gig: the former director-general of the BBC, John Birt, up on his feet and dancing to the veteran singer's music. Also in the crowd was a (comparatively) demure Sarah Brown. "It was deeply, deeply surreal," says our spy. Birt – or the "croak-voiced Dalek", as some Beeb employees christened him – has form with such behaviour. Several years ago, Pandora caught him in similarly animated mode during a performance by The Who.

Ringo, give papal peace a chance

"I'm warning you with peace and love that I have too much to do." Thus came the explanation from Ringo Starr when, in late 2008, he declared his schedule simply too full for him to respond to the bucketloads of fan mail that (apparently) still streams his way.

Pandora trusts that, with a new album to promote, his approach has mellowed somewhat. Still, anything postmarked the Vatican may well find itself heading straight to the shredder.

Told during an appearance on CNN of the recent admission by the city-state's official newspaper that The Beatles were a "precious jewel" (and not, in fact, a blasphemous abomination) Starr grumbled: "Didn't they say we were satanic? And they still forgive us? I think the Vatican has got more to talk about than The Beatles."

Mrs Brown suffers toe-curling scrutiny

A word of consolation, now, for Sarah Brown, who is enduring the indignity of having her left foot roundly scrutinised after a photo of her visit to a Hindu temple in Neasden, north-west London, revealed her crossed-over toes. The Prime Minister's wife is in glamorous company. Not long ago, paparazzi snaps of the actress Jennifer Garner, wife of Ben Affleck, sparked similar podiatric fascination after it emerged that has the same affliction. Garner has resisted surgery. Perhaps she could tweet her support?

pandora@independent.co.uk

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