Pandora: Clipboard nitwits leave Sarah out in the cold

Fickle Labour MPs might regret the day they allowed Gordon Brown to force Tony Blair from No.10, but I dare say many would have Brown's wife Sarah over her high-maintenance predecessor.

A case in point was last week, when the Prime Minister's wife was invited to the launch of the Daily Telegraph journalist Celia Walden's novel Harm's Way.

The party, which was held at the West End boite Soho House, was attended by various media luminaries, including the Newsnight presenter Emily Maitlis and David Cameron's spin doctor-in-chief, Andy Coulson.

When Brown arrived, however, her entry to the venue was blocked by the clipboard Nazis guarding the venue's door. Her name wasn't on the guest list and, since they didn't recognise her, a member of staff was dispatched to verify her invitation.

Rather than inform the door staff who she was, I'm told Brown waited patiently on the pavement outside the venue, which is flanked by two of the area's more exotic watering holes.

So, for five minutes, the wife of the country's most powerful man was left stranded on a street in Soho waiting to be let in.

"Once she got inside, Sarah thought it was hilarious," says one guest. "Though once the door dollies realised their mistake, I'm not sure they found it quite so funny."

'Viva' hate? It doesn't rile Chris

Say what you like about Coldplay singer Chris Martin, he at least can take criticism squarely on the chin.

Prior to last month's release of his band's latest album, Viva La Vida, my esteemed colleague Andy Gill penned a piece entitled: "Why I hate Coldplay."

Sensing a delightful spat in the making, the French newspaper Journal du Dimanche last week asked whether he'd read the piece. Martin, however, wasn't biting.

"No, but I know the journalist. He assassinates me every time we release an album," is all he would say.

Asked how he stops getting a big head, he replied: "I listen to the Beatles. If that doesn't work, I can re-read The Independent."

Ken's out of 'Office'

Boris Johnson has provided further fuel for the joke that Ken Livingstone is the David Brent of City Hall, in that he still turns up there despite no longer being Mayor of London.

The new(ish) Mayor was a guest of honour at the recent Board of Deputies of British Jews' annual president's dinner. In a speech to guests, he said of Ken: "He's such a lost man. He comes into City Hall and wanders about like somebody who is looking for something."

A beaten man? Not yet

If it wasn't bad enough for composer Keith Burstein being declared bankrupt last week after an unsuccessful attempt to sue the Evening Standard, he had a dressing down in court.

"The judge launched into a diatribe," said Burstein, who could not pay £67,000 legal costs. "He said, 'You are bankrupt Mr Burstein. Bankrupt. Bankrupt.' For a moment I thought he was going to pull out a strap and ask me to bend over."

Jack's Rovers at home

Jack Straw's devotion to Blackburn Rovers is not just an attempt to shore up his majority. He was recently approached by the paint company Crown, who are launching "Rovers Blue" to coincide with their sponsorship of the club. They offered to repaint Straw's constituency office the new colour. He declined, as it would violate the terms of the building's lease – but he did request two tins for a room in his constituency home.

Back on the Magic Bus – fare £50m

It's like old times for Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend, ahead of The Who's world tour this autumn.

Last week, the volatile duo were reported to be "at each other's throats" over arrangements for the tour, which kicks off in the US in October.

What's curious though, is that it's happening at all. Just last February, Townshend appeared to have pooh-poohed the idea of the pair globetrotting together.

"There is a chance that we might play some shows during the festival season this summer. I would want to do that purely for fun, and I don't want to turn it into a big tour," he insisted at the time, adding: "I need to stay focused on my writing."

Mind you, the tour is reported to be bagging them around £50m. Which I suppose is as good a reason for a dramatic U-turn as any.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

Guru Careers: Graduate Resourcer / Recruitment Account Executive

£18k + Bonus: Guru Careers: We are seeking a bright, enthusiastic and internet...

Reach Volunteering: Chair and trustees sought for YMCA Bolton

VOLUNTARY ONLY - EXPENSES REIMBURSED: Reach Volunteering: Bolton YMCA is now a...

Tradewind Recruitment: Geography Teacher

£150 - £180 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: Geography Teacher Geography teach...

Tradewind Recruitment: Geography Teacher

£150 - £180 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: Geography Teacher Geography teach...

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine