Pandora: Rushdie's former guard is being forced to apologise

Curious news from the Strand. We hear that Salman Rushdie and his former wife Elizabeth West are to be reunited at the High Court today. The pair will receive an official apology from a former bodyguard over allegations he made regarding their marriage.

The move follows an emergency hearing in which Rushdie demanded that the first run of Ron Evans's book be pulped and the offending claims withdrawn.

Evans, a former police officer, worked as a driver and bodyguard for the couple after Iranian religious leaders declared a fatwa in response to Rushdie's book The Satanic Verses.

Relations turned sour when Evans's memoirs, including several scathing attacks on the Booker Prize-winner, appeared in a national newspaper.

Included were false claims that West only married Rushdie for his money and that he was nicknamed "scruffy" by his bodyguards.

No doubt eyebrows will be raised at the prospect of Rushdie and his third wife being reunited – he left her abruptly after falling for the dancing charms of model Padma Lakshmi – though the couple have stayed in contact for the sake of their son.

"He wants her to be there," insists a member of Rushdie's legal team. "The allegations concerned her too, so it's appropriate, and she has always been very supportive."

Smile like you mean it

Disappointment at the Reading Festival this weekend, with headline act The Killers stubbornly refusing to pose for photographers, even imposing a ban on all on-stage shots.

"It's ridiculous," complained one disgruntled snapper. "Even Leonard Cohen lets us take a couple, and if there is anyone in the world who doesn't need the publicity it's got to be him. They are being divas ."

It isn't the first time that Brandon Flowers, left, and his Nevada rockers have attracted the wrath of photographers; last year they requested that similar restrictions be imposed at Chelmsford's V Festival, as well as at Ledbury's Big Chill.

Press day for Kelly

Meanwhile Kelly Osborne tried to boost her media credentials, attempting to use the Festival's press entrance rather than joining the mile-long VIP queue.

Looking particularly striking in black skinny jeans and a vintage blouse, the petite scenester cited her presenting gig on Radio 1 as proof-of-hack-status.

Sadly for Kelly, the bouncers couldn't be convinced and she was swiftly dispatched to the back of the queue.

Are you 'avin' a laugh?

Ricky Gervais appears to have forgotten his table manners. As Pandora noted last week, the comic was spotted dining out at The Ivy ordering only salad and making eyes at others' decadent choices. Was he on a diet, we wondered? Alas, Gervais has taken offence: "What sort of sad idiot watches someone eat then phones a newspaper?" he rages on his blog.

Of course, no one means to be seen at The Ivy.

Happy returns for Fry

Pandora was pleased to note birthday boy Stephen Fry's fruitful Facebook haul over the weekend.

The self-confessed technophile and all round dork not only received several dozen well-wishing "wall posts" from his 400-odd "friends", but also a range of virtual presents. Some of the highlights: some jelly babies, a cocktail, and a gold medallion.

Well-suited: Agyness and Albert

The supermodel Agyness Deyn seems to be influencing her boyfriend's personal style.

Never a fashion zero, Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond Jr admits to taking a particular interest of late, sounding off on the quality of men's suits sold on the high street.

"People hate wearing them because they fit terribly and feel strange," he complains. "You end up looking like an out-of-date parent."

Hammond, whose trademark skinny jeans and Converse trainers have won a devoted following among indie-kids, recently made his own sartorial debut, collaborating on a line with Ilaria Urbinati.

And from the sound of things, there will be plenty more to follow. "I want to make more that I'd wear myself," he says.

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

HR Manager - London - £40,000 + bonus

£32000 - £40000 per annum + bonus: Ashdown Group: HR Manager (Generalist) -Old...

Talent Manager / HR Manager - central London - £50,000

£45000 - £50000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Talent / Learning & Development Mana...

HR Manager (standalone) - London

Up to £40,000: Ashdown Group: Standalone HR Manager role for an SME business b...

HR Analyst - Banking - Bristol - £350-£400

£350 - £400 per day: Orgtel: HR Analyst - Banking - Bristol - £350 - £400 per ...

Day In a Page

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution