Tough times for Allen over US photoshoot

Another day, another unsuspecting victim falls prey to Lily Allen's considerable mouth – but this time it comes in the surprising form of The New York Times. A few months ago, the singer agreed to be interviewed for the paper's arts section.

Understandably chuffed at being sought out by such a lofty institution, Allen granted its photographer rare access inside her London home, under the slightly naïve assumption that the shoot would remain on the other side of the Atlantic. The paper's syndication department, however, had other ideas and the photos have since cropped up in OK! magazine, leading Allen to brand the cerebral folk at the Times "cheap skanks".

"Needless to say I was mortified," she says. "In fact, I was in tears, six photos of inside my home for everyone to see. It is unusual for me to allow photographers into my home, but these seemed like special circumstances. After all, The New York Times is one of the most respected news publications in the world."

The Times has responded to the rant, claiming that the 23-year-old failed to request before the interview that the photographs would not be passed on for syndication.

Erotic dancer rolls into Hay

*Here's news to put some lead in the pencil of the leather-elbowed regulars at the Hay Festival. Among the speakers at this year's distinguished literary event will be Immodesty Blaize, an erotic dancer who describes herself as "the queen of tassels" and "a dazzling, dynamite bombshell with natural curves and gravity-defying assets".

Also pencilled in to make it down to the Brecon Beacons national park in May is the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams. The organiser, Peter Florence, says: "We are hoping they won't have to share a dressing room."

Winner's Auschwitz gaffe

*Michael Winner picked an unusually receptive group for his latest example of ineptitude. The British film director, 73, was a guest at the recent Jewish Book Week, where he spoke at length about his greatest passion: himself. Referring to an uncomfortable experience waiting to appear on BBC television, he told the audience at London's Royal National Hotel: "I had to sit in a small airless waiting room for half an hour. It was worse than Auschwitz."

Get back to the good life, urges Wood

Jo Wood is leading a one-woman fight against wastefulness. According to the soon-to-be ex-wife of the Rolling Stones guitarist, Ronnie, we have become a nation of shopaholics.

"I'm always shocked when I hear about how much we buy as a nation," she says. "We are not re-using things anywhere near enough and we seem to be in a culture where stuff gets replaced, even if there's nothing wrong with it.

"Clothes should be mended rather than thrown away. It makes economical and environmental sense but it will also mean we'll cherish what we have. We need to get back down to earth with our shopping."

How true – and how admirable, coming from the lips of someone who is looking at a reported £50m divorce settlement from her estranged hubby.

Tongue-tied Titchmarsh

*It takes a lot to throw Alan Titchmarsh off his chirrupy stride, but he found himself momentarily stumped while speaking at an engagement in London last week.

The eternally sunny television presenter was introduced to nine-year-old twins Finlay and Joseph Taylor, who were after some gardening advice. "Is wee good for tomato plants?" asked the green-fingered young scamps. "Because that's what my mum's friend suggested."

After a lengthy pause, Titchmarsh finally mustered a response. "I wouldn't put it directly on to the plants," he replied. "It might be better to put it in the compost bin first."

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

Compensation and Benefits Manager - Brentwood - Circa £60,000

£60000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Compensation and Benefits Manager - Compensat...

Finance Manager - Recruitment Business (Media & Entertainment)

£28000 - £35000 per annum + negotiable: Sauce Recruitment: We have an exciting...

HR Advisor - North London / North West London

£30000 - £35000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: HR Advisor - North London...

Finance Manager - Recruitment Business (Media & Entertainment)

£28000 - £32000 per annum + negotiable: Sauce Recruitment: We have an exciting...

Day In a Page

Wilko Johnson, now the bad news: musician splits with manager after police investigate assault claims

Wilko Johnson, now the bad news

Former Dr Feelgood splits with manager after police investigate assault claims
Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands ahead of the US midterm elections

Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands

The Senator for Colorado is for gay rights, for abortion rights – and in the Republicans’ sights as they threaten to take control of the Senate next month
New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

Evidence found of contact between Easter Islanders and South America
Cerys Matthews reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of Dylan Thomas

Cerys Matthews on Dylan Thomas

The singer reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of the famous Welsh poet
DIY is not fun and we've finally realised this as a nation

Homebase closures: 'DIY is not fun'

Homebase has announced the closure of one in four of its stores. Nick Harding, who never did know his awl from his elbow, is glad to see the back of DIY
The Battle of the Five Armies: Air New Zealand releases new Hobbit-inspired in-flight video

Air New Zealand's wizard in-flight video

The airline has released a new Hobbit-inspired clip dubbed "The most epic safety video ever made"
Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month - but can you stomach the sweetness?

Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month

The combination of cinnamon, clove, nutmeg (and no actual pumpkin), now flavours everything from lattes to cream cheese in the US
11 best sonic skincare brushes

11 best sonic skincare brushes

Forget the flannel - take skincare to the next level by using your favourite cleanser with a sonic facial brush
Paul Scholes column: I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Phil Jones and Marcos Rojo

Paul Scholes column

I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Jones and Rojo
Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

While other sports are stalked by corruption, we are an easy target for the critics
Jamie Roberts exclusive interview: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Jamie Roberts: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Wales centre says he’s not coming home but is looking to establish himself at Racing Métro
How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?

A crime that reveals London's dark heart

How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?
Meet 'Porridge' and 'Vampire': Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker

Lost in translation: Western monikers

Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker. Simon Usborne, who met a 'Porridge' and a 'Vampire' while in China, can see the problem
Handy hacks that make life easier: New book reveals how to rid your inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone

Handy hacks that make life easier

New book reveals how to rid your email inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone with a loo-roll
KidZania lets children try their hands at being a firefighter, doctor or factory worker for the day

KidZania: It's a small world

The new 'educational entertainment experience' in London's Shepherd's Bush will allow children to try out the jobs that are usually undertaken by adults, including firefighter, doctor or factory worker