Peaches Geldof's final interview: The socialite on fame, heroin and people's expectations that she would die like her mother Paula Yates

The model and television presenter said that her life was "preordained"

Peaches Geldof told in her last interview of her frustration that people expected her to die like her mother Paula Yates.

The 25-year-old told the writer William Todd Schultz in an interview that has been published in The Spectator that the worst thing about growing up famous was people’s preconceptions.

She said: “It’s like I’m someone in a book. Your life, they keep telling you, is pre-ordained: 'I’m going to die like my mother, she’s going to end up like her mother.'”

Ms Geldof was found unconscious in the home she shared with her musician husband Thomas Cohen, in Wrotham, Kent, on 7 April.

An initial post-mortem last month revealed heroin was 'likely' to have been involved in her death, suggesting that there were in fact similarities with the death of her mother, who was found dead from an accidental heroin overdose at her home in 2000, aged 41.

In her final interview, Ms Geldof had also spoken about heroin, saying: “Heroin is such a bleak drug.

“It always makes me so sad to hear about people like [the actor Philip Seymour] Hoffman who were real masters and also family men who were just wasted by the constant, gnawing obsession with it. All heroin users seem to have the same core internal pain though. It’s a fascinating concept — drug of choice.”

Describing the pressures of growing up in a famous family, the daughter of Sir Bob Geldof, the musician and Live Aid organiser, said: “Every mistake I made was not only watched by my parents but the whole of the public. It was scary.

 

“From day one it was super intense. I was hyperaware of it. But as a kid, of course, I wasn’t mentally capable of understanding it. And the paparazzi freaked me out.”

Celebrities, she said, are “human beings who happen to be objects of extreme attention. But because you are unreachable, people throw rocks at you, like stoning you.”

People, she added, “love a downfall. Humans at their core are so rotten. They’re a hateful breed. It’s exciting to hate celebrities.”

Ms Geldof admitted that it was impossible to ignore what people were saying about her.

She said: “Anyone who says they don’t read their own press is categorically lying. You need to keep on top of it for your work. You cannot be in the public eye and not have it affect you.”

Perhaps ironically, Ms Geldof also said that becoming a mother to her two young sons had changed the public’s perception of her, and moved people away from predicting that she would share the same fate as her mother.

She said: “Suddenly I was this earth mother. It was an overnight transformation. Out of nowhere, it was ‘Dang. We can’t hate you anymore. Here she is in her golden hair, etc.’ Now, for the first time ever, there was gushing adulation.”

Just weeks before her death, Ms Geldof was named as a new columnist for Mother and Baby magazine.

In her only column for the magazine, published in May, she revealed she was “happier than ever” as a mother of two.

READ MORE: PEACHES GELDOF ON MOTHER'S DEATH FINAL INTERVIEW
KATIE HOPKINS BREAKS SILENCE ON DEATH OF PEACHES GELDOF
PEACHES GELDOF'S LAST MAGAZINE COLUMN REVEALS 'PERFECT LIFE'
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

Guru Careers: Graduate Resourcer / Recruitment Account Executive

£18k + Bonus: Guru Careers: We are seeking a bright, enthusiastic and internet...

Reach Volunteering: Chair and trustees sought for YMCA Bolton

VOLUNTARY ONLY - EXPENSES REIMBURSED: Reach Volunteering: Bolton YMCA is now a...

Tradewind Recruitment: Geography Teacher

£150 - £180 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: Geography Teacher Geography teach...

Tradewind Recruitment: Geography Teacher

£150 - £180 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: Geography Teacher Geography teach...

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine