The 5-minute Interview: Tamzin Outhwaite, actress

'People seem surprised by what a giggly mess I can become'

Tamzin Outhwaite, 37, appeared in EastEnders in the Nineties. Since leaving the soap she has been in dramas including Red Cap and Hotel Babylon, and will present the Sky+ Programme of the Year Award at Sunday's Bafta ceremony. Vote at www.bestonthebox.com

If I weren't talking to you right now I'd be...

Power-walking. I try to exercise every morning.

A phrase I use too often...

"How funny is that?" I'm always turning statements into questions.

I wish people would take more notice of...

The environment. People are still stocking up on plastic bags and buying 4x4s when they live in the city. It's not helping.

The most surprising thing to happen to me was...

Getting married – I'd resigned myself to thinking it would never happen.

A common misconception of me is...

That I'm stern and a bit of a tough cookie. People seem surprised by what a giggly mess I can become.

I am not a politician but...

The first thing I'd target would be youth crime. Teenagers need more chance of making it into their twenties.

I'm good at...

Helping friends with their problems. It stems from nosiness, but I've always been interested in other people's situations.

I'm very bad at...

Housework – it's pointless. A woman's work is never done, so what's the point in starting?

The ideal night out is...

Going for sushi and then on to a good musical. After that I'd come home, watch whatever I've recorded on television and be in bed by midnight.

In moments of weakness I...

Eat and drink. I am pregnant at the moment and for some reason I am craving the sensation of having something in my mouth all of the time.

In a truer life I'd have been...

A child psychiatrist. Emotions interest me and I'm fascinated by how a child's mind works.

The best age to be is...

The age you are. I like the fact I've got a past to learn from but I don't want to wish my life away either.

In a nutshell, my philosophy is this:

It's all about the journey, not the destination. So many people are focused on reaching the top of an imaginary ladder that they don't enjoy the climb.

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