The 5-minute Interview: Jack Jones, Singer

'People go for simple songs but I like something more complicated'


Hailed by Frank Sinatra as "one of the major singers of our time", Jones, 70, has recorded more than 50 albums and sang the theme tune for the American television series 'The Love Boat'. In May he embarks on a 13-date UK tour to mark 50 years in the music industry

If I wasn't talking to you right now I'd be...

Eating my breakfast, which is what I'm trying to do now! I normally have bagels with smoked salmon and a cup of coffee.

A phrase I use far too often is...

Apparently I'm always saying "That was unbelievable".

I wish people would take more notice of...

Sophisticated chord structure in music. I find great beauty in songs with a creative interpretation, but most people generally don't get that, and go for the simple songs, but I prefer something a bit more complicated, which is more meaningful to the creator.

The most surprising thing that happened to me was...

I think that was probably when I won my first Grammy. I hadn't been in the music business that long really so it came as a bit of a shock to me. I didn't expect it at all.

A common misconception of me is...

That I am elegant. Because I'm shy and a bit quiet I think people assume I'm an elegant person.

I am not a politician but...

I still reserve the right to dislike them all!

I'm good at...

Singing, producing and I'm quite good with computers.

I'm bad at...

Playing golf. That's one of the main things I'm bad at, so I don't play it any more.

The ideal night out is...

Listening to jazz, which I love. I also like to eat dinner outside in the desert because it's very nice here at this time of the year.

In moments of weakness I...

Eat chocolate. I particularly like Hershey's chocolate, the kind which has almonds in it.

You know me as a singer but in another life I'd have been...

I was always one of those fortunate people who never wanted to be anything other than a singer and an actor. Most people know me as a singer but I am also an actor.

The best age to be is...

The age where you can decide to be anything you want. But I suppose being young is good, because you've got such a long life ahead of you.

In a nutshell my philosophy is...

The golden rule is to do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Amy Fenton

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

HR Manager - London - £40,000 + bonus

£32000 - £40000 per annum + bonus: Ashdown Group: HR Manager (Generalist) -Old...

Talent Manager / HR Manager - central London - £50,000

£45000 - £50000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Talent / Learning & Development Mana...

HR Manager (standalone) - London

Up to £40,000: Ashdown Group: Standalone HR Manager role for an SME business b...

HR Analyst - Banking - Bristol - £350-£400

£350 - £400 per day: Orgtel: HR Analyst - Banking - Bristol - £350 - £400 per ...

Day In a Page

Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor