Stephen Fry says Prince Charles is probably 'not pleased' over his cocaine in Buckingham Palace admission – but doubts he'll be cast out for it

The presenter told Desert Island Discs that he and husband Elliot Spencer are also considering parenthood

Click to follow

Stephen Fry has spoken once again about his claims of taking cocaine on a trip to Buckingham Palace, but has said that while he believes Prince Charles is likely “not pleased” about the incident, he doubts the royal would permanently show him the door as a result.

Fry, 57, said he took the Class-A drug at the palace in his most recent autobiography, More Fool Me, while also admitting to using cocaine while in the House of Lords, the House of Commons, Windsor Castle, Clarence House, a number of London hotels and clubs and the premises of The Daily Telegraph, The Times and the Spectator, as well as at BBC Television Centre.

Speaking to Kirsty Young on Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs, Fry said it would be fair to say the Prince "would not be especially pleased with the idea of people doing that in the palace," but nor would he "point to the exit door to say, ‘Never return again.’”

 

Fry, who attended the blessing service of Prince Charles’ and Camilla Parker-Bowles’ following their wedding ceremony, said the royal is not “judgemental” or “prissy”.

The presenter and author, who is the president of Mind and has spoken openly of his own problems with mental health and of his bipolar diagnosis, said his drug and alcohol use was before his illness had been diagnosed. He said his drug and alcohol use was an attempt to change his mood, but added that it was “a bad idea and it exacerbates the problem”.

Fry also spoke of his husband Elliot Spencer, 27, revealing that the pair discuss the possibility of having children, adding that his own age plays a part in their decision making process. “We had better get on with it, if we do,” he told the show.

The presenter was first banished to a remote island on Desert Island Discs 27 years ago and is one of around 250 people who have appeared on the show more than once since it started in 1942.

Commenting on Fry’s repeat appearance, a BBC spokesperson said: “On occasion, we invite castaways to make a repeat appearance because we consider their lives, careers and achievements have moved on considerably since the first interview.”

Comments