Police pay £30,000 for poll tax riot `assault'

Photographer was in `excruciating pain' when held in an arm lock

A photographer at the 1990 Trafalgar Square poll tax riots who says he was rugby-tackled by police, beaten, and then falsely charged with affray - an offence carrying a three-year jail term - yesterday accepted £30,000 damages from the Metropolita n Police.

Police Commissioner Sir Paul Condon, who was not represented in court, denied liability, but had agreed to pay the damages, plus legal costs.

Roy Hanney, 33, left with an injury to his arm, had sued Scotland Yard for false imprisonment, assault and battery, and malicious prosecution by two officers from one of its territorial support group.

The High Court was told yesterday that it was only thanks to a woman who witnessed events and made an independent complaint about police behaviour that he was able to prove his innocence of the charges allegedly concocted by the two officers involved, PCs Tony Egan and Richard Ramsay.

After hearing the evidence of Nicola Todd, who said she was so "horrified" by the police action that she felt compelled to become involved, that the jury at Mr Hanney's trial, in south London, took the extraordinary step of sending a note to the judge and halted the trial.

The jury said they were "unanimously convinced of the innocence of the defendant".

Yesterday Mr Hanney's solicitor, Raju Bhatt, told Mr Justice Mitchell his client was one of many people helplessly caught in the midst of "violent and arbitrary charges by police officers with shields and batons drawn" during the anti-poll tax demonstration in March 1990.

The court was told Mr Hanney had endured "the humiliation and degradation of a violent assault and an arrest without good reason in full public view".

Mr Bhatt said PC Egan tackled Mr Hanney to the ground from behind, and then led him with an arm lock around the neck to a police van in which he was punched near the mouth, temple and eye.

Mr Hanney was in "excruciating pain", the court was told, while PC Egan held him in an arm lock at Rochester Row police station.

Mr Bhatt said after yesterday's hearing that, despite all the available evidence, the independent Police Complaints Authority had concluded that the "appropriate course of action" was for PC Egan to be "strictly admonished" for applying a wrist lock on Mr Hanney.

Mr Hanney, of Coldharbour Lane, Brixton, south London, said he was happy with the settlement, "but not terribly happy that I had to instigate these proceedings".

Latest figures show that for the year ending March 1994, the total amount of damages paid by the Metropolitan Police am-ounted to £1,761,000.

During that period, and not necessarily related to the claims against the police, 18 officers were dismissed and 16 required to resign.

Yesterday the PCA defended its action, saying that its task was to look at the allegations and decide using criminal standards of proof whether or not they were proved "beyond reasonable doubt".

The PCA has long argued that it should not have to consider cases using such a high standard of proof but should instead be allowed to consider cases of a scale of probability - as in civil cases.

"As a result of our finding, Mr Hanney was able to pursue a civil action against the police," said a spokesman.

Suggested Topics
Life and Style
life
Arts and Entertainment
Diana from the Great British Bake Off 2014
tvProducers confirm contestant left because of illness
News
Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie reportedly married in secret on Saturday
peopleSpokesperson for couple confirms they tied the knot on Saturday after almost a decade together
Sport
footballLive: Latest news from Champions League draw
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebooksAn evocation of the conflict through the eyes of those who lived through it
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Junior DBA Developer (SQL, T-SQL, SSRS, SSAS, Excel)- London

£25000 - £30000 per annum: Harrington Starr: A prestigious leading liquidity p...

SEN Teaching Assistant

£50 - £60 per day: Randstad Education Cheshire: SEN Teaching Assistant We are...

Scrum Master (Agile, Java, team recruitment)

£45000 - £60000 Per Annum + benefits: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd: Scrum M...

Junior Asset Manager

£25000 - £35000 Per Annum: The Green Recruitment Company: Job Title: Junior As...

Day In a Page

Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?