Technoquest


Q. What is the average lifespan of a horse?

Q. What is the average lifespan of a horse?

According to the Science and Technology Desk Reference book, the maximum lifespan of a horse is 62 years. Obviously not all horses will live this long and an average value will be somewhat less than 62 years. The lifespan of a horse will depend on, amongst other things, the conditions in which it lives and the pressures that are put on it during its life.

Q. Why does hair go grey?

A hair is basically a tube filled with cells and pigment with spaces between. When the hair is young the spaces are filled with fluid and this keeps the pigment in place, so your hair keeps its colour. As we get older our skin doesn't produce hair quite so well and the spaces become filled with air. The pigment is lost and the hair gradually becomes white.

Q. Can you name a star?

Officially no. Except for the few dozen bright stars named by the ancients, stars are always designated by some alphanumeric system involving their placement in the sky, such as their ordering by position in a zone of declination, by brightness (or by variability of brightness) in a constellation, or simply by the digits of their co-ordinates in some system: in some instances the stars are simply given numbers in a catalogue by some astronomer or obser- vatory who collected them for some specific purpose - such as their relatively rapid motions with respect to other stars or because of particular features in their spectra. There are organisations that will try to sell you a star, but they have no official right to do so.

Q. Which will hit the ground first, a bullet fired from a gun or one dropped from the same height?

Both bullets will hit the ground at the same time. This is because the horizontal and vertical motions of objects can be treated separately. So although the first bullet has to travel further across the ground, both bullets fall the same distance and so reach the ground at the same time.

Q. Can cockroaches survive in a microwave oven?

Not at high levels. The microwave energy causes them to "pop" as the body fluids heat up. At low levels they can sometimes survive, probably due to some property of their outer skin. The oils in it may reflect the energy to prevent "popping". We strongly suggest you don't try this at home!

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Stock Broker / Trainee Broker / Closer - OTE £250,000

£30000 - £250000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Stock Broker/ Trainee FX, Stoc...

Guru Careers: Software Developer / Web Developer (PHP / MYSQL)

£30 - 40k + Benefits & Bonus: Guru Careers: A Software / Web Developer (PHP / ...

Recruitment Genius: ICT Operations Manager

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This company is the single governing and regul...

Recruitment Genius: Purchasing Assistant

£20000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This high quality thread manufa...

Day In a Page

A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935