Cleared man awarded pounds 96,500: New pay-out after allegations against West Midlands Police. Jason Bennetto reports

A MAN who spent more than five years in jail for a crime he did not commit was awarded pounds 96,500 yesterday by the Home Office, in what is believed to be the highest single payment made to someone cleared following allegations of misconduct by the disbanded West Midlands Serious Crime Squad.

This payment means hundreds of thousands of pounds of taxpayers' money has now been paid in compensation and costs in cases involving men who were wrongly convicted or charged by the crime squad, disbanded in 1989. At least six men are still proceeding with civil actions, while a similar number are awaiting compensation from the Home Office.

Delroy Hare, 31, was sentenced to six years in prison in 1987 after being found guilty of robbery. The Court of Appeal quashed the conviction in May 1992 after serious discrepancies were discovered in evidence presented by the crime squad.

Lord Taylor, the Lord Chief Justice, expressed his 'deep regret' that Mr Hare was wrongly convicted. He was told that a scientific examination of the confession inexorably pointed to police 'cheating'. The test showed that the pages containing the confession were not written contemporaneously. Mr Hare had maintained at his 1987 trial that police had fabricated his confession.

'The evidence before the jury that they were genuine is now gravely called into question,' Lord Lane said. The Crown did not oppose the appeal but did not accept that there had been any 'cheating' by the police.

Yesterday's payment came from a Home Office scheme for victims of miscarriages of justice, which covers cases where a conviction has been overturned because of new evidence. Mr Hare is also trying to sue West Midlands Police for malicious prosecution. David Simon, Mr Hare's solicitor, said yesterday: 'For seven-and-a-half years Delroy Hare has insisted he has had no involvement in the robbery for which he spent more than five years in custody. He feels this offer of compensation fully vindicates him and represents an acknowledgement that he has been a victim of serious police misconduct. I'm delighted this matter has finally reached a satisfactory conclusion.'

So far, the force has been ordered to pay pounds 120,000 in damages to two men, as well as an estimated pounds 250,000 in costs; lawyers expect the final compensation bill to exceed pounds 1m.

The force agreed to pay pounds 70,000 damages last October to Paul Dandy, 28, who claimed detectives in the disbanded crime squad had fabricated his confession to armed robbery in 1987. Twenty men have had convictions quashed by the Court of Appeal after evidence compiled by crime squad detectives was discredited.

Last month, Derek Treadaway, 49, who served nine years in prison for armed robbery, won pounds 50,000 damages from the force after a High Court judge said he was satisfied detectives from the crime squad had placed a plastic bag over his head to extract a confession.

The 53-man squad was disbanded in August 1989 after allegations of falsified confessions in a series of failed prosecutions.

Mr Hare is the beneficiary of a system which has paid out pounds 5.5m in six years to about 100 victims of miscarriages of justice. Nearly pounds 500,000 in compensation has been paid in the past four months, including money to Winston Silcott for his wrongful conviction for the murder of Constable Keith Blakelock. The compensation covers the time spent in prison and expenses such as the cost of visits for their families.

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
News
The cartoon depicts the UK (far left) walking around a Syrian child refugee
newsIn an exclusive artwork for The Independent, Ali Ferzat attacks Britain's lack of 'humanity'
Life and Style
Man taking selfie in front of car
health
Sport
footballManager attacks Sky Sports pundit Jamie Redknapp after criticism of Diego Costa's apparent stamping
Life and Style
food + drink
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Digital Account Manager - OTE £40,000

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This web-based lead generation ...

Tradewind Recruitment: Intervention Teacher Required To Start ASAP.

£125 - £150 per day + Negotiable: Tradewind Recruitment: A 'wonderful primary ...

Tradewind Recruitment: Maths Teacher

£90 - £140 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: Our client is an 11-16 mixed commun...

Recruitment Genius: PHP / Drupal / SaaS Developer

£32000 - £36000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A rapidly developing company in...

Day In a Page

Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness
Homeless Veterans appeal: Homeless in Wales can find inspiration from Daniel’s story

Homeless Veterans appeal

Homeless in Wales can find inspiration from Daniel’s story
Front National family feud? Marine Le Pen and her relatives clash over French far-right party's response to Paris terror attacks

Front National family feud?

Marine Le Pen and her relatives clash over French far-right party's response to Paris terror attacks
Pot of gold: tasting the world’s most expensive tea

Pot of gold

Tasting the world’s most expensive tea
10 best wildlife-watching experiences: From hen harriers to porpoises

From hen harriers to porpoises: 10 best wildlife-watching experiences

While many of Britain's birds have flown south for the winter, it's still a great time to get outside for a spot of twitching
Nick Easter: 'I don’t want just to hold tackle bags, I want to be out there'

'I don’t want just to hold tackle bags, I want to be out there'

Nick Easter targeting World Cup place after England recall
DSK, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel

The inside track on France's trial of the year

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel:
As provocative now as they ever were

Sarah Kane season

Why her plays are as provocative now as when they were written
Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of a killing in Iraq 11 years ago

Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of another killing

Japanese mood was against what was seen as irresponsible trips to a vicious war zone
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore