Amy Winehouse's ex-boyfriend 'raped sleeping woman'

Reg Traviss, 35, attacked the woman after she was so drunk she could not stand, it was claimed

The boyfriend of the late singer Amy Winehouse allegedly raped a woman while she was asleep, a court heard today.

Reg Traviss, 35, attacked the woman after she was so drunk she could not stand, it was claimed.

The film director, who was Winehouse's boyfriend when she died at her home in Camden, north London, in July last year, faces two counts of rape at Southwark Crown Court. He denies the charges.

Traviss and the woman, a friend, had been drinking at three bars in the capital on December 30 last year before going to his home on Marylebone High Street.

There she alleges she twice fell asleep to wake up with him raping her.

Kate Lumsdon, prosecuting, said the complainant remembered Traviss asking if she wanted to stay at his and she assumed she had said yes.

She said: "His asking that question was the last thing she remembers that evening until woken in his bed because of a sharp pain...

"She realised he had penetrated her...

"She asked what he was doing and told him to stop.

"He stopped.

"She was very shocked.

"He offered her a drink.

"She accepted and remembers it was more alcohol, wine."

The prosecutor said the pair had a conversation in which Traviss asked her if she just wanted to stay friends.

"She said 'Yeah'.

"They chatted for about half an hour and she relaxed again.

"She could not process what had happened and could hardly believe it.

"He was acting as if nothing had happened at all."

Miss Lumsdon said the complainant felt extremely weak and suffered from a blood sugar level condition.

She said the accused asked if she wanted to go back to sleep, which she did, but woke up to find him raping her again.

"She said she felt so tired and so weak that she passed out.

"She says 'It felt just like a bad dream'.

"She remembers him saying 'Oh, I always wanted to do this to you'.

"She did not wake again 'til halfway through the afternoon."

The next day Traviss repaid the woman for some drinks she had bought the night before and showed her to the Tube so she could go home.

But before leaving the property the complainant could not find her underwear.

Miss Lumsdon said Traviss told the victim: "I actually want to keep them."

The jury of six men and six women heard that the complainant went out with friends the following night, New Year's Eve, went away to New York in the new year and waited almost three weeks before reporting Traviss to police.

The complainant went home from Traviss's house but was too embarrassed to tell her flatmate what had happened.

She met a male friend on New Year's Eve and told him.

They were walking to meet other friends for dinner but her friend suggested they should have a quiet night in instead.

"She didn't want to let their friends down and decided to try to put it out of her mind that evening," said Miss Lumsdon.

"She says that she didn't think at the time she understood the 'full scale of what had happened to her'."

On January 2 she fulfilled travel plans to stay with a male friend in New York.

She told him what had happened but was unsure if she should tell the police, the court heard.

He persuaded her to attend a hospital in The Hamptons, near where they were staying, but while waiting there she changed her mind.

She said she did so because Traviss was well-known and she did not want the incident to end up in the newspapers.

And she was worried about how much she "had to go through by reporting it".

"She thought it would be easier to forget about it," Miss Lumsdon said.

On January 18 the woman visited the Haven in Paddington, west London, where she told staff about the alleged rape.

Traviss was arrested on April 5.

The court was told their versions of the night were the same up until the final bar they visited.

Traviss, appearing in court in a jacket and tie and with his trademark Brylcreemed hair swept to the side, said they were both equally drunk - about seven out of 10.

He said that, when they got back to his property, she lit some candles and declined the suggestion that he should sleep on the sofa.

The complainant told him to sleep in the bed with her, he told officers.

They had consensual sex with a condom before stopping and moving to a sofa where they agreed "we shouldn't have done that" because they were old friends, the jury heard.

Traviss told officers the woman then said: "Oh, come on, let's go and get back into bed again."

His case is that they had sex again, and she wanted to continue but he was too tired.

They parted the next day with a "big cuddle and a kiss", he told detectives.

This afternoon the complainant, speaking from behind a screen, told the court Traviss had been "shattered" by Winehouse's death.

She said she had seen him about six weeks before the alleged rapes when he was "shattered and quite distressed" by his girlfriend's death.

She said they saw each other three or four times a year with no suggestion of romance.

She said she did not know why he attacked her.

But she said she got back into bed with the defendant after the first alleged rape because she trusted him not to touch her again.

Waking up a second time and being attacked she said: "I had this blurry understanding of what was happening and I couldn't understand if it was happening or a bad dream and I just passed out."

She added: "I can't understand how somebody so nice and gentlemanly could do something like that."

Ian Winter QC, cross examining, said the pair had consensual sex and her claims were "frankly absurd".

After the alleged rapes the pair texted each other about possibly meeting up the following night to go to a rock band's after-show party.

Mr Winter said if she had woken up being raped she would have left the flat but the complainant said she was far too tired and could not find her clothes.

The barrister said she had told police on "12 separate occasions" she "thought it was a dream".

He said she also told police: "I kind of remember the first part, the second part was really blurry, like having sex with my boyfriend,".

The complainant said she was "very very drunk" in the final bar, Jet Black, which is owned by Traviss's brother.

She said she could not stand.

Mr Winter asked how drunk she was at 3.02am and said he would come back to the issue.

The trial continues tomorrow.

PA

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