At least five British residents are left behind in Camp Delta

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The Independent Online

As the detainees were brought home from Guantanamo Bay yesterday, the Government was accused of ignoring the plight of at least five other British residents incarcerated in the camp.

As the detainees were brought home from Guantanamo Bay yesterday, the Government was accused of ignoring the plight of at least five other British residents incarcerated in the camp.

Ministers have argued that they have been unable to help the men because they were not travelling on UK passports when arrested on suspicion of terrorism.

The detainees are:

* Bisher al-Rawi, who lived in Britain for nearly 20 years after his father was arrested by Saddam Hussein. His family are UK nationals, but he retained Iraqi citizenship so that the family could keep a link with their homeland. He was questioned at Gatwick airport and released without charge in 2002. When he landed in Banjul, Gambia, he was arrested again on suspicion of links to al-Qa'ida. After being held for three months and interrogated by US investigators he was transferred to Bagram airbase in Afghanistan and then on to Guantanamo.

* Jamil al-Banna, a Jordanian national who has been granted refugee status in Britain. He was travelling with Mr Rawi and suffered the same fate upon arrival in Gambia. He has never seen his youngest daughter, who was born in April 2003.

* Shaker Abdur-Raheem Aamer, a Saudi citizen who moved to Britain in 1996, travelled to Afghanistan in 2001, reportedly for charity work. He was captured by Northern Alliance fighters and handed over to the US army. He is thought to have been taken to Guantanamo Bay in February 2002, but his wife has not heard from him for 18 months. After his capture she gave birth to their fourth child.

* Jamal Abdullah came to London from Uganda 10 years ago aged 14 to help his mother, a UK citizen, after his father died. Born a Roman Catholic, he converted to Islam. He has been in Guantanamo Bay for more than two years. It is not known how he was detained.

* Omar Deghayes, a Libyan whose family fled the Gaddafi regime 19 years ago. The partially blind law graduate was allegedly moved to Guantanamo Bay after being caught by bounty hunters in Pakistan.

A spokesman for Amnesty International said: "Like the 500-plus prisoners still held, the [UK] residents are being held in defiance of international law, held without charge and denied the right to challenge their illegal long-term detention.

"After the high-profile release of British nationals there is a danger that the UK residents will become 'forgotten prisoners'. Without the UK to stand up for them there is a real danger that these men will be almost totally forgotten - left to languish in legal limbo indefinitely. "

Clive Stafford Smith, a human rights lawyer who says there are two further British resident prisoners, rejected the argument that Britain cannot represent the men. The UK had a "moral and a legal obligation" to help, and the power to intervene, he said.