Boxing Day gunman 'felt nothing' after shooting Indian student Anuj Bidve dead

 

A man who shot dead an Indian student then labelled himself “Psycho” in court has told a jury that he felt “nothing” when he realised he had killed somebody.

Kiaran Stapleton, 21, has already admitted he killed Anuj Bidve, 23, a "random stranger" who was walking with friends through the Ordsall area of Salford in the early hours of Boxing Day last year.

Stapleton, from Ordsall, Salford, has already entered a guilty plea to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility.

But he denies murder, which carries an automatic life sentence on conviction.

Mr Bidve's parents, Subhash and Yogini, from Pune, India, sat in the public gallery just yards away from Stapleton, dressed in a grey tracksuit, in the witness box as he gave evidence at the start of his defence case at Manchester Crown Court.

The Bidve's son was studying for a micro-electronics postgraduate qualification at Lancaster University after arriving in the UK last September and was spending Christmas with friends in Manchester.

He was on his way from his hotel walking through Ordsall to the Boxing Day sales in Manchester city centre with a group of other Indian students when he was killed.

Stapleton who gave his name as "Psycho" at an earlier court hearing and had a "killer" teardrop tattoo on his face said he had been at a party and then went out to get some food.

He said his friend Ryan Holden was carrying a gun and gave it to him to hold when he decided to approach the group and ask them for the time.

Speaking about the moment he opened fire, Stapleton said: "I raised it in my right hand and then shot the firearm."

Asked by Simon Csoka QC, why he shot the gun, Stapleton responded: "I honestly don't know.

"I don't even know where I shot the guy.

"I just raised my hand and then shot it and ran."

Mr Csoka asked what was going through his mind.

He said: "It just went blank and I just turned round and ran."

Stapleton said how he and Holden ran back to his home where he showered and collected his clothes together.

While there, Ryan called him a "mad guy", Stapleton said.

The following morning they went to another friends house where he saw the news which confirmed a man had been killed.

"How did that make you feel," Mr Csoka asked.

He replied: "Nothing. I didn't think about it."

The court heard that, earlier in the night, one of Stapleton's friends told him his former girlfriend, and mother to his daughter, had cheated on him while they were living together.

Stapleton said this "wound him up" and that he was a "little bit pissed off" and "angry".

He said he would "kill" whoever was responsible, the court heard.

But he admitted that he had no idea who his girlfriend had cheated on him with.

The court was told that the gun belonged to Ryan Holden and that he handed it to Stapleton as they walked along Ordsall Road, with the intention of getting food from KFC.

Stapleton said Holden handed him the gun while he was adjusting his jeans.

That was when he saw Mr Bidve and his friends and when he decided to walk over to them.

Mr Csoka asked what his intention was and he replied: "I honestly can't say. I don't know what my intention was."

The court heard that he asked the group for the time three times before opening fire.

Asked about his mood, he said: "I was not feeling angry and I was not feeling sad. It was just a normal, calm mood."

Stapleton told the court that after the shooting they stashed the gun in the shed at Holden's grandmother's house before they went back to his mother's in Ordsall.

After showering at his house they dumped his clothes next to the bin at his sister's home and then went for breakfast at another friend's and saw the news on television.

After looking at the crime scene and the police activity in Ordsall Lane Stapleton and Holden went to stay in Leigh, Wigan, with another friend where Holden suggested they douse themselves in petrol to get the gun residue off their skin.

They stayed there for a while listening to music and "chilling", the court heard.

Stapleton said he went to bed that night and "slept right the way through".

Asked if he had any feelings the next morning when he realised what had happened, he said: "None."

"I was not thinking about what I had done. I was just feeling completely normal as if nothing had even happened," he said.

He said he briefly tried to think why it happened but there were "no answers".

"So then I just forgot about it. Never thought about it again," he added.

The jury was sent home for the day and the trial will resume tomorrow at 10am.

PA

Arts and Entertainment
books
Voices
Caustic she may be, but Joan Rivers is a feminist hero, whether she likes it or not
voicesShe's an inspiration, whether she likes it or not, says Ellen E Jones
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor and the Dalek meet
tvReview: Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Sport
Diego Costa
footballEverton 3 Chelsea 6: Diego Costa double has manager purring
News
ebooksAn evocation of the conflict through the eyes of those who lived through it
Life and Style
3D printed bump keys can access almost any lock
techSoftware needs photo of lock and not much more
Arts and Entertainment
The 'three chords and the truth gal' performing at the Cornbury Music Festival, Oxford, earlier this summer
music... so how did she become country music's hottest new star?
Life and Style
The spy mistress-general: A lecturer in nutritional therapy in her modern life, Heather Rosa favours a Byzantine look topped off with a squid and a schooner
fashionEurope's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln
News
Dr Alice Roberts in front of a
peopleAlice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Star turns: Montacute House
tv
News
i100Steve Carell selling chicken, Tina Fey selling saving accounts and Steve Colbert selling, um...
Arts and Entertainment
Unsettling perspective: Iraq gave Turner a subject and a voice (stock photo)
booksBrian Turner's new book goes back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
News
The Digicub app, for young fans
advertisingNSPCC 'extremely concerned'
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Some of the key words and phrases to remember
booksA user's guide to weasel words
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution