Celtic slam Neil Lennon pitch 'attack'

A touchline attack on Celtic manager Neil Lennon has "brought shame on Scottish football", the club's chief executive said today.





Officers arrested a man last night after he clambered from the Hearts section of the main stand on to the pitch during a match at Tynecastle stadium in Edinburgh and made towards Lennon.



The manager, who has had to live with round-the-clock security after death threats in the past, was said to have been left "shaken" by the incident.



Celtic chief executive Peter Lawwell said last night's events brought "shame on Scottish football".



John Wilson, 26, from Edinburgh, has been charged with breach of the peace aggravated by religious prejudice and assault aggravated by religious prejudice.



He appeared at a private hearing at Edinburgh Sheriff Court this afternoon. No plea or declaration was made during the hearing and he was remanded in custody.



Meanwhile, in a separate incident, two men were being held by police in connection with an investigation into parcel bombs sent to Lennon and two high-profile supporters of the club.



Two bombs were sent to Lennon and one each to lawyer Paul McBride QC and former MSP Trish Godman.



The men, aged 41 and 43, were detained under the Explosives Substances Act 1883 after officers raided a number of properties in Kilwinning, Ayrshire.



The police operation was launched at around 6am today.



A package sent to Lennon on March 4 was traced to a postbox in Gladstone Road, Saltcoats, Ayrshire, while one addressed to Mr McBride was found at a postbox in Montgomerie Terrace in nearby Kilwinning.



Police were also called to Celtic FC's stadium in Glasgow today after a suspect package was found.



The package is believed to have contained a bullet and was addressed to Lennon.



Police cordons were set up near properties in Innerwood Road, Kilwinning, and Links Road in Saltcoats.



A police spokeswoman confirmed that officers had visited other addresses, but only to speak to people they believed could help them with their inquiries.



Chief Superintendent (CS) Ruaraidh Nicolson, of Strathclyde Police, said they had carried out a "lengthy investigation" over the past month or so.



He said: "We've had about 100 officers working on it up until this point in time and even more this morning in terms of the operation."



Last month, Strathclyde Police said the two packages sent to Lennon, and the two others, were "designed to cause real harm to the person who opened them".



A fifth suspect package, addressed to the offices of Cairde Na H'Eireann (Friends of Ireland) in Glasgow, was also intercepted by officers last month.



All of the parcel bomb packages were found during March and last month.



After last night's incident, trouble flared in the Celtic section of the stadium, with fans appearing to fight with police and stewards. The Glasgow side won the game 3-0.



Lothian and Borders Police said there were a number of incidents during the match, including some violent disorder which would be fully investigated.



Hearts and the Scottish Premier League (SPL) have also launched investigations.



SPL chief executive Neil Doncaster told BBC Radio Scotland the incident was "wholly unacceptable" and "disgraceful".



Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond branded such behaviour "utterly unacceptable".



Earlier this week, seven people appeared in court charged with possessing an imitation firearm after they were arrested outside Celtic's training ground.



Mr Lawwell said: "It is intolerable that any football club, or individual, going about their lawful business in the name of sport should be subjected to this ongoing campaign of hatred and intimidation.



"This is Scotland's shame and it is high time Scotland addressed it."



He said that Lennon deserved respect for the strength of character and resilience he has shown during the "campaign of intimidation" he has endured.

News
ebooksNow available in paperback
Arts and Entertainment
tvStrictly presenter returns to screens after Halloween accident
News
Boxing promoter Kellie Maloney, formerly known as Frank Maloney, entered the 2014 Celebrity Big Brother house
people
Sport
Dwight Gayle (left) celebrates making it 1-1 with Crystal Palace captain Mile Jedinak
premier leagueReds falter to humbling defeat
Sport
Harry Kane
premier leagueLive minute-by-minute coverage
News
video
Arts and Entertainment
Jerry Hall (Hand out press photograph provided by jackstanley@theambassadors.com)
theatre
Arts and Entertainment
Damien Hirst
artCoalition's anti-culture policy and cuts in local authority spending to blame, says academic
Arts and Entertainment
tv
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Kirk Cameron is begging his Facebook fans to give him positive reviews
film
Arts and Entertainment
Jason goes on a special mission for the queen
tvReview: Everyone loves a CGI Cyclops and the BBC's Saturday night charmer is getting epic
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible
Look what's mushrooming now! Meat-free recipes and food scandals help one growing sector

Look what's mushrooming now!

Meat-free recipes and food scandals help one growing sector
Neil Findlay is more a pink shrimp than a red firebrand

More a pink shrimp than a red firebrand

The vilification of the potential Scottish Labour leader Neil Findlay shows how one-note politics is today, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Tenderstem broccoli omelette; Fried eggs with Mexican-style tomato and chilli sauce; Pan-fried cavolo nero with soft-boiled egg

Oeuf quake

Bill Granger's cracking egg recipes
Terry Venables: Wayne Rooney is roaring again and the world knows that England are back

Terry Venables column

Wayne Rooney is roaring again and the world knows that England are back
Michael Calvin: Abject leadership is allowing football’s age-old sores to fester

Abject leadership is allowing football’s age-old sores to fester

Those at the top are allowing the same issues to go unchallenged, says Michael Calvin