Clues still elude Met in rogue private eye hacking inquiry

Scotland Yard has seized more than 100 computers and arrested 20 people during inquiry

The extent of computer hacking by rogue private investigators remains unknown after a two-year investigation, a senior police officer said today.

Scotland Yard has seized more than 100 computers and arrested 20 people during its inquiry into computer hacking, but said that it could only investigate when it received complaints from alleged victims. Eleven others have been questioned under caution.

Operation Tuleta was set up in 2011 following allegations that the now defunct News of the World was involved in computer hacking, which followed other inquiries into bribery and phone hacking.

A new strand of the inquiry, Operation Kalmyk, looking at private investigators, has resulted in 13 arrests and with three others being questioned under caution.

Det Chief Supt Gordon Briggs, which oversees the inquiry, said the extent of computer hacking remained “unknown” with 16 officers working on the computer hacking inquiry.

“Of the material that we hold, we’re conducting a thorough investigation of that for computer hacking offences,” he said. “There may be other people committing those offences for which the police have no intelligence, nor evidence.”