Dave Lee Travis trial: DJ 'knew Jimmy Savile liked young girls' and thought 'good luck to him'

He also described groping behaviour as the 'norm' in the 1970s

Veteran DJ Dave Lee Travis told police after his arrest on suspicion of sexual offences that he would have reported fellow BBC broadcaster Jimmy Savile if he had known he was a paedophile.

Travis said he knew that Savile liked young girls and thought “good luck to him”.

But he told police that he did not think the girls were under-age, jurors at London's Southwark Crown Court heard.

Reading extracts from interviews with police after Travis's arrest in November 2012, junior prosecutor Teresa Hay said that, although the defendant denied the offences, he described such groping behaviour as the “norm” during the 1970s.

Ms Hay told jurors: “He said if he had touched someone's breasts he would admit it as it was considered to be a bit flirtatious at the time and no-one thought that much about it.

Dave Lee Travis trial: Former employee says BBC 'slammed the door in her face' after she complained about DJ  

”He said the allegations did not happen. If any of it had been true he would apologise and accept that this was the norm in that period."

Asked about his relationship with disgraced presenter Savile, Travis told the Operation Yewtree officers that he only knew him as a colleague.

Ms Hay said Travis told police regarding Savile: “Like most people at the BBC I did not know him.” He added that Savile had a “verbal wall” that he could not get through.

Former BBC DJ Dave Lee Travis pictured in 1981 Former BBC DJ Dave Lee Travis pictured in 1981
68-year-old Travis from Buckinghamshire, denies 13 indecent assaults and one sexual assault, dating back to 1976 at the height of his fame.

The alleged offending includes when he was working as a BBC DJ, as a broadcaster with Classic Gold radio, while appearing on Top Of The Pops, and when starring in panto.

Dave Lee Travis trial: BBC DJ 'asked journalist to pose in photographs at his home'  

Jurors heard Travis described the allegations as ”degrading“ towards him and that he was ”fair game“ because of his celebrity status.

The court heard he told officers he thought it ”incredible that people were coming out of the woodwork“ after 40 years, and said he expected it was because they wanted to sell their stories due to a ”money grabbing culture“.

Referring to evidence heard yesterday from a woman who said Travis attacked her in a BBC studio while presenting his Radio 1 show in the mid 1970s, jurors were told: ”He said he would have had to be a moron to do anything in the studio when people could see in from outside.“

Asked by officers about the similarities between some of the women's accounts, the defendant said: ”Two people who are not connected are both telling porkies.“

Dave Lee Travis trial: Young woman 'groped at BA party'  

The court heard he described allegations that he groped a teenage girl in the audience of Top Of The Pops in 1978 as ”ridiculous and stupid“.

”There were cameras on him from all angles and the show goes out to 20 million people,“ Ms Hay said.

Travis described himself as a ”tactile“ person who would usually kiss and or hug men and women when meeting them, but said he would never grope them.

Travis, who is on trial charged under his real name, David Patrick Griffin, listened to the evidence from the dock with the aid of headphones.

Jurors were told that, after initially being arrested and questioned on 15 November 2012, he was interviewed by police on three further occasions in March, August and September last year.

Travis denies all the charges against him. The trial was adjourned until Monday.

PA

 

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn