Ealing riot killing teenager named as Darrell Desuze

 

A teenager who killed pensioner Richard Mannington Bowes during the London riots can be named as Darrell Desuze today after an order banning his identification was lifted.

The 17-year-old had been protected because of his age but a judge removed the order at Inner London Crown Court today a day after he admitted manslaughter.

Desuze, of Bath Road, Hounslow, punched Richard Mannington Bowes to the ground on August 8 last year during rioting in Ealing, west London.

Mr Bowes, who had been trying to put out a fire in a dustbin near his home, suffered brain damage when his head hit the pavement.

He died three days later in hospital.

Desuze admitted manslaughter when he appeared in court yesterday.

He also pleaded guilty to violent disorder and had previously admitted burglary at William Hill, Tesco Express, Blockbusters and Fatboys Thai restaurant on August 8.

Mr Justice Saunders said in terms of consequences, it was the most serious crime committed during the riots and the public had a right to know what happened and who killed Mr Bowes, a retired accountant.

Desuze, who a year before the riots enjoyed a school trip to the Metropolitan Police's riot training centre in Gravesend where he watched a simulated riot with officers pelted with bricks, still faces a charge of murder but the Crown will not pursue it and it is expected to lie on file.

Brian Altman QC, prosecuting, said on the evening of the killing Desuze, known as Smokey, set off for Harrow with friends.

But they headed to Ealing after getting a text from someone anticipating trouble there.

Desuze, wearing sunglasses and a distinctive top saying "Robbers and Villains" was caught on camera kicking in the glass doors of a shopping centre before joining a mob that attacked heavily outnumbered police with missiles around Spring Bridge Road.

"But one thing distinguished him from the others," said Mr Altman.

"He killed Richard Bowes, an entirely innocent local resident who had intervened to extinguish flames and prevent a fire in one of the bins."

The barrister said left-handed Desuze threw his full weight behind a punch to Mr Bowes's jaw, buckling his legs, knocking him unconscious and backwards where his head took the full force of impact on the road.

The police were "simply unable to reach Mr Bowes for some minutes because of the violence against them," said Mr Altman.

After walking off, Desuze returned to the victim and moved him onto the pavement.

"If it was concern for what he had done, it was short lived," said Mr Altman.

"Instead of calling an ambulance or summoning any of the policemen around he was in minutes rejoining the riot."

Mr Bowes sustained "catastrophic brain injuries" and never regained consciousness.

Mr Altman said Desuze, who was just 16 at the time, left the scene and within 10 minutes of delivering the fatal blow was breaking into a William Hill, Tesco Express, Blockbusters and a Thai restaurant.

As officers and members of the public battled to save Mr Bowes, who was breathing but unresponsive and bleeding, thugs continued to shower them with debris, the court heard.

Mr Altman said the prosecution accepted Desuze's guilty plea only on a "full facts" basis.

He would not accept it if Desuze continued with his "belatedly" offered explanation - he wanted to argue that he was provoked and was acting in self-defence.

Desuze's mother, Lavinia Desuze, 31, will stand trial on Monday accused of perverting the course of justice by destroying the clothes he wore on the night.

She appeared at court today and chose to stay in the dock with the killer after her case was adjourned.

Desuze will be sentenced next month after pre-sentencing reports have been completed.

PA

News
people'It can last and it's terrifying'
Sport
Alexis Sanchez, Radamel Falcao, Diego Costa and Mario Balotelli
football
Sport
Danny Welbeck's Manchester United future is in doubt
footballGunners confirm signing from Manchester United
News
people Emma Watson addresses celebrity nude photo leak
News
ebooksAn unforgettable anthology of contemporary reportage
Sport
footballFeaturing Bart Simpson
News
Katie Hopkins appearing on 'This Morning' after she purposefully put on 4 stone.
peopleKatie Hopkins breaks down in tears over weight gain challenge
Arts and Entertainment
Olivia Colman topped the list of the 30 most influential females in broadcasting
tv
News
Kelly Brook
peopleA spokesperson said the support group was 'extremely disappointed'
Life and Style
techIf those brochure kitchens look a little too perfect to be true, well, that’s probably because they are
Sport
Andy Murray celebrates a shot while playing Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
TennisWin sets up blockbuster US Open quarter-final against Djokovic
Arts and Entertainment
Hare’s a riddle: Kit Williams with the treasure linked to Masquerade
booksRiddling trilogy could net you $3m
Arts and Entertainment
Alex Kapranos of Franz Ferdinand performs live
music Pro-independence show to take place four days before vote
News
news Video - hailed as 'most original' since Benedict Cumberbatch's
News
i100
Life and Style
The longer David Sedaris had his Fitbit, the further afield his walks took him through the West Sussex countryside
lifeDavid Sedaris: What I learnt from my fitness tracker about the world
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

James Frey's literary treasure hunt

Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering