Greek taxi drivers held over death

The two taxi drivers suspected of being involved in an attack which left a teenage former England football team mascot dead and four others injured are still being questioned today by police, according to the Greek embassy.

Robert Sebbage, 18, died in the early hours of yesterday after the incident in which he was fatally stabbed at the Lagana resort on the popular Greek island of Zakynthos.



The two Greek drivers have been arrested and detained and the weapon recovered, local police said.



The four injured Britons are being treated in hospital for injuries that are not life-threatening.









Mr Sebbage's family is believed to be heading out to Greece today to learn about the incident and police investigation for themselves.



The incident happened as Mr Sebbage had been with his friends outside a nightclub when an argument started with the taxi drivers.



Reports have said the incident followed a laser pen being aimed at the drivers.



A Greek news website reported that one of the drivers said after the incident: "I was annoyed because the young British tourists bothered us with lasers."



A 21-year-old is facing a murder charge and his 25-year-old colleague is charged with complicity to commit murder, according to local police.



A spokesman for the Greek embassy in London confirmed that the suspects were currently in custody and were still being questioned.



He said: "They were taken into custody, they are being questioned and they should be in court in about the next two days.



"We cannot express anything while they are being questioned."



Pupils at Mr Sebbage's former school will tomorrow morning hold a minute's silence in his memory.



Headteacher Malcolm Christian said that to reflect Mr Sebbage's love of sport, a one-minute applause would also be held at the school's sports personality of the year evening being held next Thursday.



He added: "All at the Hurst Community College were saddened to hear of Robert's untimely death.



"He held a special place in our hearts for the way in which he had fought hard to overcome a significant medical condition when he was younger.



"We remember the many friendships he had created, his quiet tenacity in overcoming adversity and how well he achieved with us at GCSE level prior to going on to sixth form college."









Brian McDermott, manager of Reading Football Club, of which Mr Sebbage was a keen fan, said that all at the club had been "deeply saddened to hear of the tragic passing of our young season ticket holder".



He added: "It is very difficult to even talk about. He was only 18 years of age and a big Reading fan. It's awful, everyone just feels for his friends and family.



"Of course, we send our deepest condolences on behalf of everyone connected with the club."



Mr McDermott added that the club would contact Mr Sebbage's family when it was appropriate and offer any help and support it could.



A campaign has been launched on Facebook to hold a minute's silence in memory of Mr Sebbage at Reading's season opener against Millwall on August 6.



Tributes have also flooded in to three other Facebook pages set up in the teenager's memory.



A statement released yesterday on behalf of the Sebbage family by Hampshire Police said: "All these young men are very close friends.



"They are simply just a bunch of nice lads and this is their first holiday abroad and they had all gone just to enjoy themselves."



Hampshire Police said they were liaising with the Sebbage family on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.



In 2007, Mr Sebbage was chosen to be a mascot for the England team in a friendly against Brazil at the new Wembley Stadium and posed for photographs next to David Beckham.





Jane Sharpe, CEO of Rays of Sunshine, said that the charity was heartbroken to hear of Mr Sebbage's death.



She said: "We are devastated by the tragic news of Robert Sebbage. Our heartfelt condolences go out to his family at this heartbreaking time.



"It was our privilege to have met Robert when we fulfilled his wish to be mascot for the England football team when he was 14. "Robert battled with his illness for many years, only to have his life stolen from him in such a cruel manner.



"We will always remember Robert's pride and excitement as he stood alongside David Beckham. Our thoughts are with his parents and family."

News
ebooksAn unforgettable anthology of contemporary reportage
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?

A crime that reveals London's dark heart

How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?
Meet 'Porridge' and 'Vampire': Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker

Lost in translation: Western monikers

Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker. Simon Usborne, who met a 'Porridge' and a 'Vampire' while in China, can see the problem
Handy hacks that make life easier: New book reveals how to rid your inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone

Handy hacks that make life easier

New book reveals how to rid your email inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone with a loo-roll
KidZania lets children try their hands at being a firefighter, doctor or factory worker for the day

KidZania: It's a small world

The new 'educational entertainment experience' in London's Shepherd's Bush will allow children to try out the jobs that are usually undertaken by adults, including firefighter, doctor or factory worker
Renée Zellweger's real crime has been to age in an industry that prizes women's youth over humanity

'Renée Zellweger's real crime was to age'

The actress's altered appearance raised eyebrows at Elle's Women in Hollywood awards on Monday
From Cinderella to The Jungle Book, Disney plans live-action remakes of animated classics

Disney plans live-action remakes of animated classics

From Cinderella to The Jungle Book, Patrick Grafton-Green wonders if they can ever recapture the old magic
Thousands of teenagers to visit battlefields of the First World War in new Government scheme

Pupils to visit First World War battlefields

A new Government scheme aims to bring the the horrors of the conflict to life over the next five years
The 10 best smartphone accessories

Make the most of your mobile: 10 best smartphone accessories

Try these add-ons for everything from secret charging to making sure you never lose your keys again
Mario Balotelli substituted at half-time against Real Madrid: Was this shirt swapping the real reason?

Liverpool v Real Madrid

Mario Balotelli substituted at half-time. Was shirt swapping the real reason?
West Indies tour of India: Hurricane set to sweep Windies into the shadows

Hurricane set to sweep Windies into the shadows

Decision to pull out of India tour leaves the WICB fighting for its existence with an off-field storm building
Indiana serial killer? Man arrested for murdering teenage prostitute confesses to six other murders - and police fear there could be many more

A new American serial killer?

Police fear man arrested for murder of teen prostitute could be responsible for killing spree dating back 20 years
Sweetie, the fake 10-year-old girl designed to catch online predators, claims her first scalp

Sting to trap paedophiles may not carry weight in UK courts

Computer image of ‘Sweetie’ represented entrapment, experts say
Fukushima nuclear crisis: Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on - and may never return home

Return to Fukushima – a land they will never call home again

Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on from nuclear disaster
Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize
Online petitions: Sign here to change the world

Want to change the world? Just sign here

The proliferation of online petitions allows us to register our protests at the touch of a button. But do they change anything?