Hannah killed just as she was 'flourishing into a woman'

"Precious and fragile" were words used by friends and family to describe the intelligent teenager whose life was squeezed out of her just as she was "flourishing into a woman", aged only 17.

Hannah Foster, who was known for her beaming smile and caring nature, was tipped to be a great future academic success having already excelled at her GCSEs with 11 A* grades.



With a wide range of interests and abilities, Hannah had a full spectrum of choices ahead of her: she was praised at school and college for her success in sciences and humanities but her heart was set on studying medicine at university.



Hannah wanted to be like her mother Hilary, a cardiac nurse, and to prove to her parents that she had what it took to become a doctor.



And in memory of her aspirations to help others, Hannah's parents set up a memorial fund, with proceeds going to the volunteer emergency doctor service Basics (British Association for Immediate Care).



Mrs Foster said: "Hannah was always a very happy person. One of those sort of children with a ready smile.



"You know that expression people say about flourishing into a young woman, that was what we were witnessing.



"She was just the sort of girl that you just always felt proud of."



Mr Foster added: "We as a family are devastated by the loss of Hannah.



"Hannah was a warm, kind-hearted 17-year-old girl who could always see good in others."





Mr Foster added: "She was always very protective, that's the one thing that struck me: how protective she was to her younger sister.



"If ever I was telling Sarah off, she'd always try to pacify me or take the blame."



Intelligent but in no way a boffin, Hannah was a normal teenager who enjoyed going to the pub with her friends, although she was not one for drinking to excess, and loved rock music - her favourite band was the Red Hot Chili Peppers.



In her first year at Barton Peveril College, in Eastleigh, Hannah gained five AS qualifications: four A grades in geology, chemistry, biology and history, and one B grade in fine art.



At the time of her death, she had gone on to study A-levels in the four subjects she had got an A in.



Vice principal Pat Mullins said: "She was one of the most able students in her year group.



"She wanted to be a doctor because she felt it would be a career which would combine her passion for science with her desire to care for others.



"She believed it would provide her with the opportunity for continuous learning and involve her in the welfare of the community.



"She had completed a work placement at Southampton General Hospital the previous summer which had confirmed her aspiration and we believe she would have made an inspirational doctor."



Mrs Mullins said that a memorial tree - "Hannah's Tree" - had been planted at the college.



She added: "As well as being an outstanding student academically, the staff at Barton Peveril remember her as lively, enthusiastic, full of fun but with a sensitive and thoughtful approach to life.



"She was musical, she played the flute, but she also enjoyed working with others in different ways and was completing her Duke of Edinburgh award.



"She was simply loved by her friends and this was obvious at the memorial services held at the college."



Classmate Hannah McGranaghan said she was a very popular girl.



She said: "Hannah was quiet, caring and had many friends. She was always happy to help and was rarely seen around college without a smile on her face.



"This tragedy shocked everyone. Her parents and Barton Peveril College have done, and are still doing, a lot in her memory, showing just how much she meant to the people that knew her.



"Thanks to them, she will never be forgotten."



Another friend, Leanne Murdoch, said in the months after her death that Hannah impressed fellow pupils with her intelligence but was always modest.



She said: "Of all the people in this world, Hannah deserved it least. She was so precious and fragile and would never have hurt a fly.



"If she ever thought you were having a bad day, she would try to brighten you up."



Leanne said that Hannah believed in peace and, ahead of her time, was very aware of environmental issues.



She said: "Hannah was very plucky and determined and was mentally very tough and solid - there's no way she would have left this world without a fight.



"It's so sad because she had everything planned. Her future was all laid out before her and now it's been taken away.



"Hannah always said she wanted to follow in her mum's footsteps, who was a nurse, but get the qualifications to be a doctor. She was so intelligent. I never knew anyone who loved schoolwork so much."



More than 300 people turned out for Hannah's funeral which was held at her community church, Highfield Church, just around the corner from her home in Grosvenor Road, Southampton.



Hannah's former history teacher Anne Richardson paid tribute to her, saying: "She was possessed of an extraordinary intellect."



And her former English teacher Clive Pitts, from Cantell School in Bassett, said: "She was just a wonderful young lady.



"I can't begin to make sense of Hannah's tragedy but what I do know is that I will remember her forever and I am grateful to have been her English teacher."

News
ebooksNow available in paperback
Voices
Ukip leader Nigel Farage arrives at the Rochester by-election count
voicesIs it any wonder that Thornberry, Miliband, and Cameron have no idea about ordinary everyday life?
Sport
sportComment: Win or lose Hamilton represents the best of Britain
Life and Style
tech
Sport
Arsene Wenger reacts during Arsenal's 2-1 defeat to Swansea
footballMan United and Arsenal meet on Saturday with both clubs this time languishing outside the top four
News
i100BBC political editor Nick Robinson had a lot of explaining to do
Life and Style
Nappies could have advice on them to encourage mothers and fathers to talk to their babies more often
newsTalking to babies can improve their language and vocabulary skills
Sport
Tony Bellew holds two inflatable plastic sheep at the weigh-in for his rematch with Nathan Cleverly
boxingGrudge match takes place on Saturday night
Arts and Entertainment
Mark Ronson at PS1
arts + ents
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

US immigration: President Obama ready to press ahead with long-promised plan to overhaul 'broken system' - but will it get past a Republican-controlled Congress?

Immigration: Obama's final frontier

The President is ready to press ahead with the long-promised plan to overhaul America's 'broken system' - but will it get past a Republican-controlled Congress?
Bill Cosby rape allegations explained: Why are these allegations coming out now? Why didn’t these women come forward earlier? And why has nobody taken legal action?

Bill Cosby rape allegations explained

Why are these allegations coming out now? Why has nobody taken legal action? And what happens next for the man once thought of as 'America's Dad'
Four years of excruciating seizures caused by the 1cm tapeworm found burrowing through a man's brain

You know that headache you’ve got?

Four years of excruciating seizures caused by the 1cm tapeworm found burrowing through a man's brain
Travelling to work by scooter is faster than walking and less sweaty than cycling, so why aren’t we all doing it?

Scoot commute

Travelling to work by scooter is faster than walking and less sweaty than cycling, so why aren’t we all doing it?
Paul Robeson: The story of how an American icon was driven to death to be told in film

The Paul Robeson story

How an American icon was driven to death to be told in film
10 best satellite navigation systems

Never get lost again: 10 best satellite navigation systems

Keep your vehicle going in the right direction with a clever device
Paul Scholes column: England must learn to keep possession and dictate games before they are exposed by the likes of Germany and Brazil

Paul Scholes column

England must learn to keep possession and dictate games before they are exposed by the likes of Germany and Brazil
Michael Dawson: I’ll thank Spurs after we win says defender as he prepares to return with Hull

Michael Dawson: I’ll thank Spurs after we win

Hull defender faces his struggling former club on Sunday ready to show what they are missing. But he says he will always be grateful to Tottenham
Frank Warren column: Dr Wu has big plans for the professionals yet he should stick to the amateur game

Frank Warren column

Dr Wu has big plans for the professionals yet he should stick to the amateur game
Synagogue attack: Fear unites both sides of Jerusalem as minister warns restoring quiet could take 'months'

Terror unites Jerusalem after synagogue attack

Rising violence and increased police patrols have left residents of all faiths looking over their shoulders
Medecins sans Frontieres: The Ebola crisis has them in the headlines, but their work goes far beyond West Africa

'How do you carry on? You have to...'

The Ebola crisis has Medecins sans Frontieres in the headlines, but their work goes far beyond West Africa
Isis extends its deadly reach with suicide bombing in Kurdish capital

Isis extends its deadly reach with suicide bombing in Kurdish capital

Residents in what was Iraq’s safest city fear an increase in jihadist attacks, reports Patrick Cockburn
Underwater photography competition winners 2014 - in pictures

'Mysterious and inviting' shot of diver wins photography competition

Stunning image of cenote in Mexico takes top prize
Sir John Major: Negative West End portrayals of politicians put people off voting

Sir John Major hits out at theatres

Negative West End portrayals of politicians put people off voting
Kicking Barbie's butt: How the growth of 3D printing enabled me to make an army of custom-made figurines

Kicking Barbie's butt

How the growth of 3D printing enabled toy-designer to make an army of custom-made figurines