Hogan 'must not intrude on daughter's life'

The family of John Hogan's former wife said today they will fight to protect his daughter Mia from "unwanted intrusion by her father".

John Hogan will return to Britain within the next week after he was freed from a Greek psychiatric unit by a court in Athens on Friday.

While Hogan prepares to return to Bristol in the coming days his former wife Natasha Visser fears he will try to make contact with their young daughter Mia.

The 36-year-old killed six-year-old son Liam after jumping from a Crete hotel balcony with him and two-year-old Mia in his arms following an argument with Ms Visser.

Liam died of head injuries but Hogan and Mia survived with broken limbs following the plunge on August 15, 2006.

Hogan has been receiving treatment in a psychiatric hospital in Athens since he was cleared last year of murder.

He has reportedly spoken of his desire to be reunited with Mia, who lives with her mum in Australia, and has kept a diary to give to her when she is older to explain the tragic events.

Today Brian Chandler, the stepfather of Ms Visser and family spokesman, issued a statement on behalf of the family.

They say they have "great apprehension, but not surprise" at Hogan's wish to contact Mia.

"This is precisely what we have been afraid of, and he clearly has no idea how much damage and distress he has already caused to so many people's lives throughout two families," the statement said.

"I admire the Hogan family's steadfast resolve to help John, and in this, they have now succeeded.

"But in this process, the Hogan family have completely lost sight of Mia and Liam's rights.

"Liam did not deserve to die at age six and neither did Mia deserve the ongoing traumatic nightmares and the deep sense of loss for her loving brother that she has endured.

"Just imagine the psychological damage the experience alone has already done to a sensitive young girl.

"We want Mia to forget, for now, the terrifying events in August 2006, to have peaceful sleep, to have the happy childhood she deserves, and to live a normal life."

He added that Mia is "a very brave little girl" who is happy in her new life in Australia.

"Liam's rights are never forgotten by Natasha or her family, and Mia will be protected from unwanted intrusion by her father for as long as we think necessary," the statement continued.

"No mother would allow contact between a killer and his intended victim.

"Why should Natasha have to live with the constant fear that Hogan will suddenly contact Mia? Why should she live as a fugitive in the future, to ensure Mia's safety? The Hogan family will have to get to grips with the fact that Hogan, by his actions has shown that he is both dangerous, and unpredictable.

"By his attitude he has also shown that he should never be allowed contact with Mia. He forfeited that right in August 2006."

Hogan was found not guilty of murder on psychiatric grounds in January last year after a court on Crete upheld his defence that he had suffered an "earthquake of psychosis".

Hogan's mother and sister had both campaigned to Greek authorities to let him seek treatment in the UK where they said he would be given all the love and support he needs.

Earlier this month, the High Court quashed a 2006 inquest ruling that Hogan unlawfully killed his son, claiming the original verdict was flawed.

The Crown Prosecution Service has said no action would be taken against him in Britain.

Hogan, who still uses a crutch after the balcony leap, maintains he has no recollection of Liam's death.

Suggested Topics
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Arts and Entertainment
Getty
News
Women have been desperate to possess dimples like Cheryl Cole's
people Cole has secretly married French boyfriend Jean-Bernard Fernandez-Versini after just three months.
Arts and Entertainment
AKB48 perform during one of their daily concerts at Tokyo’s Akihabara theatre
musicJapan's AKB48 are one of the world’s most-successful pop acts
News
Ian Thorpe has thanked his supporters after the athlete said in an interview that he is gay
people
News
The headstone of jazz great Miles Davis at Woodlawn Cemetery in New York
news
Arts and Entertainment
Brendan O'Carroll has brought out his female alter-ego Agnes Brown for Mrs Brown's Boys D'Movie
filmComedy holds its place at top of the UK box office
News
newsBear sweltering in zoo that reaches temperatures of 40 degrees
Arts and Entertainment
Professor Kathy Willis will showcase plants from the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew
radioPlants: From Roots to Riches has been two years in the making
Extras
indybestThe tastiest creations for children’s parties this summer
Arts and Entertainment
TV The follow-up documentary that has got locals worried
Arts and Entertainment
Paolo Nutini performs at T in the Park
music
Life and Style
Swimsuit, £245, by Agent Provocateur
fashion

Diving in at the deep end is no excuse for shirking the style stakes

Arts and Entertainment
Eminem's daughter Hailie has graduated from high school
music
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream as Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream

Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil
Saharan remains may be evidence of the first race war, 13,000 years ago

The first race war, 13,000 years ago?

Saharan remains may be evidence of oldest large-scale armed conflict
Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Researchers hope eye tests can spot ‘biomarkers’ of the disease
Sex, controversy and schoolgirl schtick

Meet Japan's AKB48

Pop, sex and schoolgirl schtick make for controversial success
In pictures: Breathtaking results of this weekend's 'supermoon'

Weekend's 'supermoon' in pictures

The moon appeared bigger and brighter at the weekend
Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor