IPCC 'not even close' to conclusion on Moat death

The police watchdog said today it was "not even close" to establishing the timeline of events surrounding the death of gunman Raoul Moat after a report suggested he was Tasered after he shot himself.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission said it was still analysing the evidence and could not confirm the report said the 37-year-old murderer shot himself then was hit by Tasers fired by armed police at the end of a six-hour stand-off last month.



The exact circumstances of how the gunman died have been the subject of intense speculation after the controversial use of Tasers when a national manhunt ended in Moat's death.



Family members have paid for a second post-mortem examination, claiming the first found no evidence that Moat was hit by Tasers.



A source told Sky News how police negotiators felt they were making positive progress with him during the stand-off in the Northumberland town of Rothbury.



Moat discussed how life would be in prison, but then the tone changed and he got to his feet and moved his shotgun to the side of his head.



He said how he would miss his loved ones, and shortly after shot himself, according to the report.



After the blast, officers fired Tasers twice, although neither round made proper contact with him, it was reported, lodging instead in his hooded top.



That would explain there being no marks on his body from the stun gun rounds.



The IPCC took over the Moat inquiry immediately after his death on July 10.



A spokesman today said investigators still have much work to do, analysing audio of the run-up to the blast and checking the accounts of the armed officers and negotiators.



"We are not there yet," the spokesman said. "We are not even close to being there yet.



"I do not know who the source is, but this has not come from our investigation. It is not something that has been established by our investigation yet."



The Moat family solicitor had no comment to make on the report, and neither did Northumbria Police.



Moat shot and wounded his ex Sam Stobbart in Birtley, Gateshead, last month, after killing her new lover Chris Brown.



The day after he blinded unarmed Pc David Rathband by shooting him in the face on the outskirts of Newcastle.



He then declared war on police and went into hiding for a week before he was cornered at the River Coquet in Rothbury, the pretty tourist town where he was suspected of lying low.











Moat's uncle, Charlie Alexander, said the results of the second post-mortem examination are not due to be published for two weeks.

The former Royal Artillery warrant officer, 72, said that until the results are known, any theory on Moat's death is just speculation.



Speaking from his home in Leam Lane, Gateshead, Mr Alexander said: "The idea that Raoul shot himself before he was Tasered would appear to clear the police. I have no idea where this information has come from.



"The findings of the second post-mortem are still not due for another fortnight. When they are known only Angus and I, the coroner, the IPCC and our solicitor will be informed.



"We had the IPCC inspectors here on Thursday to speak to us about how the investigation was going and they knew nothing about the potential findings of the second post-mortem.



"We want this done properly. It's why we paid for the second post-mortem. It's because we want to get things straight. We don't want anything left in doubt. So until it is done, I don't see how people can just guess what happened."



Mr Alexander said life is slowly returning to normal for the family.



He said: "Things are settling down now. We put Raoul's ashes in the river and had a quiet fish dinner in Rothbury and that was that.



"My new great-granddaughter was born last night, so today is a good day.



"We just want things to get back to normal."

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn