Jury taken to see the flat where Jo Yeates was killed

Jurors in the Joanna Yeates murder trial visited her flat, which was preserved with personal belongings and Christmas decorations since her death on 17 December.

The jury spent 22 minutes in the flat, where family pictures had been left out, but turned away from view.

Despite a damp smell after 10 months without heating in the basement flat, the layout of the living room remained untouched.

The curtains were drawn with tinsel decorated along the rail.

There were obvious signs of police attempts to gather DNA evidence, with red dots and dust residue showing where detectives had found fingerprints.

The jury was also shown the bedroom Ms Yeates shared with Mr Reardon. The couple's double bed and duvet remained with two wardrobes full of clothes and a bedside table adorned with perfumes, make-up and cuddly toys.

There was further sign of police evidence taking in the small kitchen and bathroom, where a handful of bottles of shampoo and conditioners had been left. The shower and bath unit had been heavily dusted for fingerprints.

Before visiting the flat the jury was taken in convoy on a luxury black coach up Park Street, where Miss Yeates had begun her night.

It stopped outside the BDP office, where she worked, then paused again outside the Bristol Ram pub where she had joined colleagues.

The jury disembarked near Clifton Village, then walked to the Tesco Express, where Miss Yeates bought a pizza, and a shop, formerly named Bargain Booze, where she picked up some cider.

They were then taken to Miss Yeates' home.

The case was adjourned to return to Bristol Crown Court tomorrow, when the jury will hear the first witness evidence.

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