Lee Rigby murder anniversary: I'll never forgive Adebolajo and Abebowale, says soldier's mother

 

The mother of murdered soldier Lee Rigby has said she will never forgive the two Islamist fanatics who killed him.

Fusilier Rigby's murder sparked shock across the country after he was run over with a car and then hacked to death by British Muslim converts Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale in Woolwich, south-east London, on May 22 last year.

Speaking a year after her 25-year-old son's death, Lyn Rigby told ITV's Good Morning Britain: "I will never forgive them for what they did to Lee. Never."

She felt justice was done after Adebolajo was told he will spend the rest of his life behind bars while Adebowale was given a minimum jail term of 45 years for the attack.

"I know that they won't get out now," she said. "They cannot do this to another family."

Mrs Rigby explained how she has found it difficult to cope with Lee's murder.

"It's hard to get up in the mornings, just to put one foot in front of the other," she said.

She recalled how she attended the Old Bailey trial of her son's killers to see what emotions they felt.

Michael Adebolajo (left) and Michael Adebowale were found guilty of the murder of soldier Lee Rigby Michael Adebolajo (left) and Michael Adebowale were found guilty of the murder of soldier Lee Rigby "I just really wanted to look in their eyes and see if they showed any remorse. I got nothing.

"There were a couple of times I couldn't go. They talked about Lee's injuries in very raw details and I couldn't sit through that," she said.

Mrs Rigby went on to describe the type of memorial she thinks should be built for her son in Woolwich.

"I don't want him to be forgotten," she said. "I think a plaque or some fitting tribute for where Lee died."

There has been disagreement over whether he should be given a memorial in the town where he was killed.

Thousands of supporters have backed calls for the soldier to be given a permanent remembrance site in Woolwich but the local authority and MP Nick Raynsford have rejected the campaign.

Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper said: "My thoughts today are with the family and friends of Drummer Lee Rigby.

"I also want to pay tribute to the people of Woolwich, and Greenwich more widely, who refused to let extremism, and those seeking to exploit their grief soon after, divide their community.

Murder trial: The family of Lee Rigby at court Murder trial: The family of Lee Rigby at court "Drummer Rigby's service will never be forgotten, nor will the British people's steadfastness in the face of abhorrent terrorist crimes."

London Mayor Boris Johnson said: "Today Londoners remember Fusilier Lee Rigby, a man who was serving his country in a job he loved and who had everything in life ahead of him, and yet was brutally killed in broad daylight on a London street.

"We think of his family, their continuing sense of loss and injustice. No family deserves the shock and pain they have faced.

"We also remember the extraordinary response of the city on that day: the members of the public who went to comfort the dying man, like Amanda Donnelly and her daughter Gemini. We salute again the fearlessness of Ingrid Loyau-Kennau who stood up to armed killers and told them what she thought of them.

"It is some satisfaction that those killers have now been brought to justice but it is even more important to note that they failed in their intent.

"They wanted to divide this city. They wanted to sow hate and recrimination among Londoners. Instead, our city has come together as never before - and shown the world what we are: a place of generosity and openness where no terrorist will ever win."

PA

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Arts and Entertainment
Reimagined: Gwyneth Paltrow and Toni Collette in the film adaptation of Jane Austen's Emma
books
Arts and Entertainment
Jesuthasan Antonythasan as Dheepan
Cannes 2015Dheepan, film review
Sport
sport
News
Richard Blair is concerned the trenches are falling into disrepair
newsGeorge Orwell's son wants to save war site that inspired book
Arts and Entertainment
The pair in their heyday in 1967
music
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine