Max Clifford trial: James Bond actress 'kicked publicist between the legs when he lunged at her'

Film extra said she can remember the publicist's 'smelly breath'

A woman who was an extra in a James Bond film told a court that she kicked publicist Max Clifford "between the legs really hard"when he allegedly “lunged” at her after promising he would be able to secure her a role alongside Charles Bronson.

The woman told London's Southwark Crown Court she was about 20 when Clifford suggested he become her agent after she landed a minor part in Octopussy, starring Roger Moore, in the early 1980s.

The alleged victim described how she was “very frightened” and “screamed” at Clifford to leave her alone after he allegedly forced himself on her in his Bond Street office.

The woman, now 52, said Clifford told her he would make her famous and could get her a part in the new Bronson film but needed some photographs of her in lingerie first.

She said that after posing for pictures she got dressed, and Clifford “then lunged towards me and tried to kiss me”.

The woman, one of seven alleged victims of indecent assault by Clifford, said she “resisted” the PR adviser but he pushed her back on to a sofa.

She told the court: “He was on top of me and hands all over the place and still trying to kiss me. Then I got very frightened and I kicked him between the legs really hard.

”It was such a fleeting moment but it seemed like he was all over me. I just remember his smelly breath.“

She told the court she grabbed her belongings and ran away and never saw Clifford again.

Film producer Barbara Broccoli leaves Southwark Crown Court on 24 March Film producer Barbara Broccoli leaves Southwark Crown Court on 24 March She said she had suspected something strange was going on when, she claims, Clifford had told her Bronson would need to see some photos of her in lingerie before casting her.

She told the court he gave her some money to go and buy nice underwear but she said she felt ”a bit disconcerted and started to get uncomfortable“ when she realised that Clifford did not have a studio as she had assumed, and that he was going to take the photos in his office.

She said Clifford told her to ”do the James Bond pose“ and then sit on the sofa.

She told jurors she posed with her legs closed but Clifford asked her to open them, which she did not want to do.

She said she then noticed he was not using a ”proper photographic camera“ but an instamatic-type camera that he had to wind on.

”I just basically wanted to leave the room and get dressed,“ she said. ”I think he didn't have a film in the camera and he was pretending to take photographs of me.“

After she got dressed, she said Clifford claimed to be on the phone to Bronson and passed it to her before leaving the room.

She said she spoke to a man with an American accent who told her he was looking forward to meeting her before Clifford re-entered the room and she passed him back the phone.

Wearing a navy blazer, white shirt and grey trousers, Clifford, 70, listened from the dock with the aid of a hearing loop.

Jurors also heard evidence from the film's executive assistant, Barbara Broccoli, who told the court she did not think that her father, Bond producer Cubby Broccoli, ever met Clifford.

The court previously heard that Clifford claimed he represented Cubby Broccoli, and told one alleged victim she would have to sleep with the producer so she could be in one of his films.

But Ms Broccoli, 53, told jurors: “As far as I know he did not know him.”

She also said she did not think she met Clifford or had any direct contact with him but knew he was an agent to some of those who worked on the film, including Olympic gymnast Suzanne Dando.

Clifford, from Hersham in Surrey, is accused of 11 counts of indecent assault against seven women and girls. He denies all the charges. The trial continues.

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