More victims of abuse priest come forward

As James Robinson prepares to spend the rest of his life behind bars, it was disclosed a further three victims have come forward.

Detectives say the three men reported their abuse at the hands of Robinson during their investigations, but declined to take part in the court process.



The number of lives irrevocably changed by Robinson's evil now stands at nine, but detectives say they are certain more are remaining silent.



Today they are urging these people to take the brave step to talk to police.



Commenting after the guilty verdicts, Detective Sergeant Harry May said: "As we investigated this case, we found nine victims. Six were mentioned in court and for personal reasons, three weren't able to come to court.



"I have no doubt there are more victims, not only in this country but in America.



"On a personal note, I would like to say how brave these men have been, giving their testimonies in court.



"We couldn't have done it without them."



Detective Chief Inspector Steve Bimson, who headed the Major Investigation Team, spoke of the difficulties of bringing Robinson to justice



He said: "Historic abuse cases are always difficult. We rely very much on witness testimony, which in many cases is many years old and clearly we have problems with fading memories.



"In this investigation, the first complaint was made in 1985. As the investigation started, Robinson moved to the States and legalities, at that time, stopped us from bringing him back.



"Over the following years there were many letters from the church to Robinson, asking him to come back, but clearly Robinson didn't want to return to the UK."



Mr Bimson added: "Whilst Robinson wasn't seen as a sexual predator at the time, going through the grooming that took place - it was the same process - he became ingrained in these families, he became a trusted member of the family, so he could target these individuals.



"But it wasn't recognised at the time that this was taking place.



"Looking at Robinson now, his abusive activity started in the late 1950s. He became a trusted member of the community and he then built on that by joining the priesthood.



"We have heard evidence from people who thought he was a fine priest who would come into a parish and make changes and start motivating people.



"They found it difficult to believe he had committed this abuse.



"But clearly the evidence and the decision of the jury by accepting what the victims have said, demonstrates this abuse has taken place and Robinson did live this double life.



"We know there were other victims who didn't want to be part of the process. I'm sure as the publicity of what we are doing now there will be others.



"If anyone does want to get in touch with us, they will be dealt with sensitively and confidentially."

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
News
i100
Life and Style
food + drinkClue: You'll either love them or you'll hate them
News
Howard Marks has been diagnosed with inoperable cancer, he has announced
people
News
newsIf you're India's Narendra Modi, it seems the answer is a pinstripe suit emblazoned with your own name
News
peopleWarning - contains a lot of swearing
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project