Mother to play Joanna Yeates in reconstruction

The mother of Joanna Yeates has offered to take part in a TV reconstruction of her daughter's last-known movements in Bristol.

Avon and Somerset Police are planning a reconstruction of the landscape architect's last steps, which will be shown on the BBC programme Crimewatch later this month.

Theresa Yeates, 58, is keen to take on the role because she is of similar height and build to her daughter.

Her husband, David, 63, told The Sunday Times: "My wife looks a bit similar to Jo and would like to take the part. I don't know whether the police will involve us at all." Her request came as details of the supposedly final text message Miss Yeates sent on the night she disappeared in Bristol emerged.

Friend Matthew Wood told The Sun he received a text from her at 8.20pm on December 17, saying: "Where are you? Do you fancy a drink?" He said he replied back at 9.20pm that night, but never received a reply.

Miss Yeates was last seen buying pizza at a Tesco supermarket 8.40pm. Earlier she had lunch with her boyfriend Greg Reardon, 27, at the Hope and Anchor pub in Jacobs Wells Road, Clifton, before returning to work at architecture firm BDP in nearby Hill Street.

The 25-year-old then went for Christmas drinks at The Ram pub in Park Street with her work colleagues at 6pm. She left at 8pm to make the 30-minute walk home to the flat she shared with Mr Reardon in Canynge Road, Clifton.

She was caught on CCTV in a Waitrose supermarket at the Clifton Triangle and then went to a Tesco Express in Clifton village where she bought the pizza. Detectives said Miss Yeates had made it home because her shoes, coat, mobile phone, purse and keys were found there - although the pizza, the wrapping and its box are still missing.

When Mr Reardon - who had been away for the weekend visiting family in Sheffield - returned to Bristol two days later, he raised the alarm. Police launched a massive hunt for Miss Yeates and her snow-covered body was found by a couple walking their dogs on Christmas morning in a country lane in Failand, North Somerset - just three miles from her home. She had been strangled.

At the weekend, the Yeates family paid a series of tributes as they made a fresh plea for help. Speaking publicly for the first time, Miss Yeates' brother Chris, 28, said his sister's death had left him in a "surreal hole of despair". Their parents also spoke of the daily trauma they have been forced to endure since their daughter was snatched and dumped in a country lane "like a piece of garbage".

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