‘No lessons have to be learned’ from Mark Duggan shooting, claims senior police officer

 

A senior police officer today claimed that no lessons could be learned from the operation which ended with the shooting of Mark Duggan.

Acting Det Supt Mick Foote  denied that the operation was flawed, or went wrong because of inaccurate intelligence or deficient supervision. Mr Foote, who was in charge of the Metropolitan Police’s gun crime unit in north-west London, told the inquest: “I am quite satisfied with the way things went” although there had been  “obviously tragic circumstances”.

No officer involved in the  operation had been moved or suspended, the court heard.

Mr Duggan, 29, was shot dead  by police officers who had been  following a minicab in Ferry Lane, Tottenham, in August 2011.

Mr Foote was cross-examined by Michael Mansfield QC, representing the Duggan family at the Royal Courts of Justice. The QC described the police operation as “the result of flawed planning, in which you were involved, which was based on a failure by you and others to  properly assess and implement  accurate intelligence that was the result of deficient supervision”.

Mr Foote said that gangsters  tended to lead “chaotic lifestyles” and did not act predictably, which meant police had to be ready to react spontaneously.

Mr Mansfield asked him: “Have lessons been learned?”

Mr Foote replied: “I have often thought about that and I can’t think of what lessons have to be learned.”

The inquest continues.

PA

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

Still carrying the torch

The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

...but history suggests otherwise
The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

The bald truth

How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

Tour de France 2015

Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

A new beginning for supersonic flight?

Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash
I would never quit Labour, says Liz Kendall

I would never quit party, says Liz Kendall

Latest on the Labour leadership contest
Froome seals second Tour de France victory

Never mind Pinot, it’s bubbly for Froome

Second Tour de France victory all but sealed
Oh really? How the 'lowest form of wit' makes people brighter and more creative

The uses of sarcasm

'Lowest form of wit' actually makes people brighter and more creative
A magazine editor with no vanity, and lots of flair

No vanity, but lots of flair

A tribute to the magazine editor Ingrid Sischy
Foraging: How the British rediscovered their taste for chasing after wild food

In praise of foraging

How the British rediscovered their taste for wild food
Simon Pegg talks Star Wars, Mission Impossible and Game of Thrones

'I’m constantly pinching myself'

Simon Pegg talks Star Wars, Mission Impossible and Game of Thrones
Ashley Madison: The cheat's guide to using the extramarital website

Ashley Madison

The cheats' guide to using the extramarital affair website
Valentino's vision lives on in Chiuri and Piccioli

Valentino's vision lives on

Valentino is a byword for opulence. And now Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli are carrying on the great man's legacy
Stunning new Nasa images of Pluto show glacier-like moving ice formations

Stunning new images of Pluto

Nasa New Horizons team reveal latest pictures
Iran – the land where some 700 souls were executed last year

Iran – where some 700 souls were executed last year

It's not surprising that hanging and beheading have become a grim feature of 'justice' in the Muslim world, says Robert Fisk