Police appeal for witnesses after six-year-old boy shot in neck in Dublin shooting

The boy is said to be in a "stable" and "non-life-threatening" condition

Irish police investigating the shooting of a six-year-old boy have called on anyone who may have been involved to come forward.

The child is said to be in a “stable and non-life threatening” condition and is being treated at the Our Lady’s Hospital in Crumlin on the outskirts of Dublin.

Police are now stepping up their investigation and are keen to get information on the identities of the attackers.

A senior investigating office has been appointed and the scene is being examined by the Gardai’s Technical Bureau.

Police have also been conducting extensive door-to-door interviews to find out if any of the boy’s neighbours have any information.

The boy, who is yet to be named, is reported to have been shot when men pushed open the front door of his house in the Croftwood area of Ballyfermort on the outskirts of Dublin and began to fire into the hallway.

A spokesman from the Gardai said: "The shooting occurred shortly after 10pm, a six-year-old boy received what is believed to be a gunshot wound to his neck. When Garda arrived on scene they administered first aid until the arrival of the ambulance."

According to reports, the Gardai have a clear line of inquiry but are still urging anyone with any information to come forward.

It is believed that the Gardai does not believe the six-year-old was the intended target and his wounds could have been caused by the ricocheting bullet.

According to reports, the child’s uncle was also in the house; however, he was not thought to have been injured as a result of the incident.

A local woman told the Irish Independent: "I heard a bang, I thought someone had smashed my window.

"I came out and everyone was screaming. I stared throwing towels out to people who were helping him to stop the bleeding.

"I couldn't look, it was horrible. He looked so small and scared. His glasses were up at his forehead."

Additional reporting by the Press Association