Raoul Moat's jail boast before gun rampage

Shotgun killer Raoul Moat boasted "I'll be back inside by Friday" shortly before his murder rampage, a court heard today.

The former doorman, who had been released from Durham Prison just hours earlier, told a barber who was cutting his hair: "I have got a few things to do and I've got a few arses to kick.



"I'll probably be back inside by Friday."



Moat, 37, had become obsessed that his ex-girlfriend was seeing another man after ending their six-year relationship.



He was determined to track down her new boyfriend and was bent on revenge, prosecutor Robert Smith QC told Newcastle Crown Court.



He enlisted the help of his former business partner Karl Ness, 26, and Ness's friend Qhuram Awan, 23, during his rampage.



The pair, who were arrested in Rothbury, Northumberland, days before Moat shot himself following a stand-off with police, are standing trial at Newcastle Crown Court.



Ness is charged with the murder of Chris Brown, who was shot dead on July 3.



Ness and Awan are both charged with the attempted murder of Pc David Rathband, who was shot and blinded by the crazed fugitive.



Ness denies the murder of Mr Brown, attempting to murder Pc Rathband, one charge of conspiracy to murder, one charge of possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life, and one of robbing a fish shop.



Awan denies the attempted murder of Pc Rathband, one charge of conspiracy to murder, one charge of possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life, and one of robbing a fish shop.



Ness, of Brookside, Dudley, North Tyneside, and Awan, of Rowley Street, Blyth, North Tyneside, entered not guilty pleas at a hearing earlier this month.







The court heard that karate instructor Mr Brown had started a relationship with Moat's ex-girlfriend Sam Stobbart, 22, while the ex-bouncer was prison.



Moat shot Mr Brown three times, which required him to re-load the weapon.



"That fact alone will give you some idea of Raoul Moat's intentions when he fired that gun," Mr Smith said.



Moat then shot Ms Stobbart through the window of her mother's house in Birtley, Tyneside.









Mr Smith told the jury: "The events in question arise out of the actions of a man named Raoul Moat, who in the course of less than 24 hours shot and killed one man and used the same weapon, a shortened double-barrelled shotgun, to inflict severe and life-threatening injuries on two other people."



He added: "The case which you are to try involves two men who, the prosecution say, were Moat's willing accomplices.



"Both men were also parties to a criminal conspiracy to commit offences which also involved Raoul Moat effectively to shoot police officers."



Less than 24 hours after shooting the couple in Birtley, Moat blasted Pc Rathband in Denton Burn, Newcastle, as the officer carried out "his ordinary duties", the court heard.



"He left Pc Rathband severely injured and blinded for life.



"The following day Moat entered a fish and ship shop in Seaton Delaval carrying the weapon he had used in the preceding two days. He threatened the proprietor and staff and forced them to hand over takings."



The court heard that Moat, who met Ms Stobbart when she was 16, was jailed for assaulting a child last April.



They split up but he was "persistent in trying to restore the relationship".



"During their time together, Moat was a violent and possessive man and that attention was to continue after Sam Stobbart had left him," Mr Smith said.



She saw Moat's jail sentence as a way to end the relationship permanently, the jury heard, and phoned him in prison to that effect.



Mr Smith said: "His resentment smouldered while he was in custody, fuelled by the suspicion that Sam Stobbart had met another man.



"Moat's enduring resentment continued to develop, so much so that he formulated a plan to kill the man he suspected Sam Stobbart was by then involved with. He didn't know who the man was or where he lived, but he discovered the man was a martial arts instructor."



Moat wrongly believed his rival was a police officer because Ms Stobbart had told him that. She knew "Chris Brown could expect trouble" when her ex was released, Mr Smith said, and hoped the lie would warn him off.



The jury heard that when Moat was released from prison, Ness was there when he searched the internet for a karate instructor near Ms Stobbart, and calls were made to the local leisure centre.







Ness worked for Moat's gardening firm and kept the business and his home running while the boss was in jail, the court heard.



Awan was a friend of Ness who worked at a garage in Byker, Newcastle, which Moat began to use.



Moat and Ness spoke regularly on the phone while he was in Durham Prison, and they knew their calls were monitored by the authorities.



In one call Moat instructed Ness to text Ms Stobbart that when he got out "he was going to kick her nice and proper", the court heard.



Moat told Ness to stake out her home, to go through her bins and to watch for cars visiting, Mr Smith said.



The prosecution claimed Moat's conversations with Ness on the phone were part of a plan to acquire a shotgun to be used on Mr Brown, and that the defendant was "a willing accomplice".



Mr Smith continued: "Karl Ness was a willing participant in planning and carrying out that shooting and Ness, together with Qhuram Awan, went on to assist Moat to shoot Pc Rathband and after that carry out the armed robbery which Moat committed in Seaton Delaval."



The prosecution said it should be made clear that Awan was not there when Moat shot his love rival and his ex-girlfriend.



The trial, which could last five weeks, continues.

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