Suspect held over Stockholm bombing

A man has been arrested in connection with the Stockholm suicide bombing, police said today.

The 30-year-old was detained in Glasgow this morning in connection with the bombing in Sweden in December last year.

The foreign national was arrested under the Terrorism Act shortly after 6am in the Whiteinch area of the city.

It is alleged the man was involved in aiding terrorists in Sweden.

The suicide bomber, Iraqi Taimour Abdulwahab al-Abdaly, 28, who studied at the University of Bedfordshire, blew himself up and injured two people in a botched attack in Stockholm.

Police said there was no evidence to suggest that there was a direct threat to Scotland.

The man is being held and interviewed in Glasgow, police said.

A Strathclyde Police spokesman said: "At 0605 hours on Tuesday March 8, Strathclyde Police conducted an operation in the Whiteinch area of Glasgow.

"This has resulted in a 30-year-old foreign national being arrested under the Terrorism Act (2000).

"The operation centres on a previous incident in Sweden. It was intelligence-led and relates to allegations that this individual has been involved in aiding terrorist activities outwith Scotland."

Two people were wounded in central Stockholm in what appeared to be the first suicide bombing in Sweden's history.

Iraqi-born student Abdulwahab, who lived in Luton, killed himself and injured the two others in the Swedish capital's shopping district on December 11 2010.

Detectives in Britain and Sweden have been investigating whether Abdulwahab was supported by others or acted as a lone attacker.

Officials said at the time the bombing appeared "well-planned" and worked on the assumption that he was helped by others.

Police said the arrest was not linked to an explosion in woods near Gartocharn, in West Dunbartonshire, last year.

Anti-terrorism police and bomb disposal units were called to the remote forest near Loch Lomond on November 17.

The police spokesman said: "There is no evidence to suggest that there is a direct threat to Scotland posed by this person, nor is this linked to the events in Gartocharn last November."

The Metropolitan Police confirmed they were working with Strathclyde officers on the inquiry.

It is understood the matter will be dealt with in Scotland if charges are brought against the man.

Two other properties in Glasgow were being searched this morning, sources confirmed.

Abdulwahab apparently killed himself as he tried to set off a car bomb in a busy shopping street.

After the vehicle caught fire he fled, blowing himself up a short distance away.

The suicide bomber travelled to Britain in 2001 and attended Bedfordshire University before graduating and marrying in 2004.

He settled in Luton with his wife Mona, with whom he had three young children, two girls and a boy.

He went missing from the family home two and a half weeks before the bombing.

A white Audi packed with gas canisters, which was severely damaged in the attack, was found to be registered to Abdulwahab.

Experts said at the time that the bomber probably did not succeed in detonating all the explosives and could have caused much greater damage.

The attack was similar to the two attempted car bombings which involved gas canisters in London's West End in 2007.

The Swedish Security Service said the arrest was made following collaboration between Scotland and Sweden.

A statement released today said there was "good co-operation between prosecutors and the police authorities".

It read: "Strathclyde Police, Scotland, has today arrested a person suspected of offences under the Terrorism Act.

"Scottish investigations show that there could be a connection between the person now arrested and the terrorist attack in central Stockholm on December 11 2010, something the continuing investigation in Scotland will clarify.

"Strathclyde Police is in charge of the investigation and the arresting.

"The arrest made in Scotland is the result of the Scottish police investigation, the collaboration between Scotland and Sweden within the scope of international judicial assistance, and a good co-operation between prosecutors and police authorities."