Three murderers were treated by the same mental health trust

 

Three patients who killed three men in separate attacks were all being treated by the same mental health partnership, reports said today.

The men were all convicted of separate homicides committed in 2008 in Bristol, North Somerset and Wiltshire while receiving care from Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust.

The three independent reports each identified "no direct causal factors" between the care and treatment the three men received and the killings.

James Allen was convicted of murdering his neighbour Terry Hall during a row over a discarded washing machine.

Liam Churchley was jailed alongside his mother, brother and cousins for the savage killing of Alan Riddock outside a pub, while James Bible was detained indefinitely for stabbing his friend to death.

All three had been receiving treatment for a variety of problems, including drug and alcohol addiction and psychiatric disorders.

While the reports highlighted aspects of care that could have been better, each report concluded that it would "not be reasonable" to conclude that these had an impact on each incident.

A total of 28 recommendations are made in the separate reports, of which 22 relate to the Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust.

Dr Arden Tomison, medical director for the trust, said: "On behalf of the Trust I would like to offer again our condolences to the families and friends of all the victims and to those who have been affected.

"The investigation reports acknowledge the considerable efforts made by our staff to support each service user in the years leading up to the incidents.

"Across the Trust our staff deal with individuals whose complex needs, behaviour and reluctance to be helped can make delivering effective care support very difficult.

"The decisions our staff make about the care and support provided to service users are informed by the best clinical understanding of their individual clinical needs.

"I would like to thank all our staff for their dedication and commitment in supporting people under our care and reassure people that the risk of any act of violence being carried out by a person with mental health needs is very small.

"We also note the investigation teams' endorsement of the internal investigations undertaken by the Trust after each incident and their support for the actions identified to improve ongoing patient care which we have already implemented.

"As the independent investigations highlight, aspects of the way we worked in 2008 could have been better - for example in the way we engaged with families, in collaborative working, in risk management, in sharing information and in care planning - and these are handled very differently today.

"But the investigation teams acknowledge that even if different approaches had been followed, it is not reasonable to assume that the outcomes would have been different."

The findings of the three reports were considered in turn at a meeting of the NHS South of England's patient and care standards sub-committee.

The families of all three victims and their respective killers were invited to attend but only the relatives of Mr Hall attended.

Deborah Hall, Mr Hall's partner of 18 years, said afterwards in a statement: "Terry died unnecessarily. Terry does matter and we have waited nearly five years for some answers.

"This whole process had had a big impact upon the family and we feel it is too easy for the victims to be forgotten.

"We hope that this report goes some way in protecting innocent people in future."

PA

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003
Barbara Woodward: Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with the growing economic superpower

Our woman in Beijing builds a new relationship

Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with growing economic power
Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer. But the only British soldier to be awarded the Victoria Cross in Afghanistan has both

Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer

Beware of imitations, but the words of the soldier awarded the Victoria Cross were the real thing, says DJ Taylor