Traffic officer used position of authority to ask for sex

A traffic patrol police officer who used his position of authority to ask women for sex while on duty was jailed for three-and-a-half years today.

Jamie Slater, 33, offered to excuse driving offences if the women agreed to meet up with him or give him their mobile phone numbers, Cardiff Crown Court heard.



He was convicted of misconduct while in public office.



The South Wales Police constable also used the force's database to retrieve personal details about his victims.



One woman was driving with only a provisional licence when Slater pulled her over, the court was told.



Peter Davies, prosecuting, said: "Mr Slater told her he would have to retain and impound the motor car she was driving.



"This caused her to be upset and she began crying. It was at that point Jamie Slater told her if she would give to him her mobile number he would not cause the car to be retained. She agreed to do so."



The court heard they began a consensual affair and on one occasion the pair met for sex while Slater was on duty and he received an emergency call on the police radio.



The police officer, of Port Talbot, South Wales, became involved in a high speed chase while the woman was hiding in the car, the court was told.



When her husband found out about the affair Mr Slater retrieved his details from the police database and sent him taunting messages, Mr Davies said.



One victim was pulled over when she drove through a red light and gave Slater her phone number because she was scared of the consequences of refusing, the court was told.



He later sent her graphic text messages.



Mr Davies said: "She was left scared and upset and said she will never get into a police vehicle again, having lost faith in the police force."



The barrister said all Mr Slater's victims felt powerless to do anything because he was a police officer in uniform.



Sentencing Slater, Mr Justice Lloyd Jones said he acted in "a particularly predatory manner."



He added: "These offences were deeply stressful to the victims.



"They felt powerless because you were a police officer.



"Your activities have caused immense damage to the public confidence in the police."













Mr Davies said Slater sent goading text messages to the husband of one woman after getting his number from the police database.



He said: "He began sending texts taunting him saying: "I'm f****** your wife...."



On another occasion, Slater pulled over a woman and told her he would impound her car for driving without insurance.



He said if she agreed to meet up with him he would see she got her car back without pay for the cost of the recovery.



The woman later told police: "It was a complete abuse of trust by someone in authority," the court heard.



Mr Davies said Slater sent her text messages asking her to wear stockings, saying he was aroused.



He later sent her messages telling her where she had been that day and what she was wearing. He also sent her a photograph of her driving her new car.



The barrister said: "She felt she was effectively being stalked. He would pull up in a patrol car outside her place of work and remain there for 20 minutes."



He later sent her a message saying: "I hope you burn in hell with your husband."



He sent another woman, who he pulled over for driving through a red light, messages saying: "Will you have sex with me today?"



The court also heard Slater pulled over a 19-year-old girl who was speeding on the M4 motorway and told her she could lose her licence if she was prosecuted.



He said he would let her off and asked for her mobile number.



The court heard he took her for drives in his patrol car and tried to kiss her and touch her leg.



Another of his victims was a pregnant woman Slater had never met.



He sent her a message saying: "Fancy meeting up for some sexy fun?"



The woman declined but Slater persisted. She eventually agreed to a meeting so she could find out who had been contacting her, the court heard.



When she arrived at the meeting place a police car pulled over and an officer asked her for directions.



The court heard that Slater was driving the car.



He later text her saying: "Did you used to be a working girl? How much do you charge for a f***? I want to f*** you. Will you send me a pic?"



Mr Davies said: "One day she received 35 texts with explicit requests for sex using vulgar tones."



Slater also met up with prostitutes while on duty. He contacted one asking if she wanted to join a business he was setting up selling sexual services. He later paid her for sex.



He met another prostitute, who he used to visit frequently as client and tried to have sex with her. When she refused because he had no money he later sent her an obscene text message.













Tom Crowther, mitigating, said Slater, who used to be a chartered surveyor, had always wanted to be a police officer.

He said: "It is perhaps a truism that wanting something is more compelling and satisfying than achieving it."



He told the court that Slater, who is married with two children, suffered from depression and had financial difficulties prompting him to set up a driving school to make extra money.



Mr Crowther added: "Underneath the uniform was a very insecure and unhappy man."



He said it was clear Slater would never work in the police force again and told the judge: "The opportunity to offend came from a position of authority.



"It is plain he will never again hold a position of authority."



Tom Davies, Independent Police Complaints Commissioner for Wales, said Slater was dismissed from South Wales Police in December.



He said: "Slater was a disgrace to all who work for the police service and abused the position of trust a serving police officer is given."



He added: "Slater was a rotten apple and acted alone.



"The public can be reassured that cases such as this are very rare, but where officers act in a criminal way they will be brought to account by the IPCC and the police service."

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Sport
Kim Sears is reported to have directed abuse at Berdych
tennis
Arts and Entertainment
Cold case: Aaron McCusker and Christopher Eccleston in ‘Fortitude’
tvReview: Sky Atlantic's ambitious new series Fortitude has begun with a feature-length special
Voices
Three people wearing masks depicting Ed Miliband, David Cameron and Nick Clegg
voicesPolitics is in the gutter – but there is an alternative, says Nigel Farage
Voices
The veterans Mark Hayward, Hugh Thompson and Sean Staines (back) with Grayson Perry (front left) and Evgeny Lebedev
charity appealMaverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
News
i100
News
people
Sport
Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho
footballThe more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Life and Style
Vote green: Benoit Berenger at The Duke of Cambridge in London's Islington
food + drinkBanishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turn over a new leaf
News
Joel Grey (left) poses next to a poster featuring his character in the film
peopleActor Joel Grey comes out at 82
News
i100
News
business
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee