White supremacist group 'considered itself most racist'

A white supremacist group considered itself the most racist and extreme neo-Nazi movement in Britain, a court heard today.

Members of the Aryan Strike Force believed groups like the notorious far-right Combat 18 and Blood and Honour did "f*** all" and were more interested in raising money than fighting "scum".



The shocking revelation emerged during the trial of ex-milkman's assistant Nicky Davison, 19, who is charged with possessing terrorism manuals.



Newcastle Crown Court has already heard that the teenager was one of the founders of the Aryan Strike Force, an online far-right group set up by his father, Ian.



Ian Davison, 41, a former pub DJ, has already admitted six charges related to this case, including producing ricin, one of the world's deadliest substances.



The aim of the group was to carry out "ops" and overthrow the Government, which it believed had been taken over by the ZOG - the Zionist Occupied Government.



After studying videos, messages posted online and logs of internet chat, Dr Matthew Feldman, a lecturer at the University of Northampton, said the Aryan Strike Force considered itself the most extreme right-wing group in Britain.



"Some of these groups like Blood and Honour and Combat 18 are seen as not being 'active' enough," Dr Feldman, an expert in the ideology of post-war fascism and neo-Nazism, told the jury.



"Aryan Strike Force would regard itself as the pinnacle and the most uncompromising form of neo-Nazis groups available in the UK.



"The Aryan Strike Force regarded itself as the most active, rejectionist and unwilling to compromise on its principles.



"The other movements would be more concerned about finances rather than focusing on direct action or revolutionary tactics.



"It was an unmistakable example of neo-Nazis in Britain and this permutation is the most overtly hostile.



"Legion88, the Aryan Strike Force and WolfPack represented the most aggressive and dangerous form of neo-Nazism.



"One, moreover, which seems to be on the most extreme form of (the) neo-Nazi spectrum, and this group may be considered an exemplar of violent revolutionary neo-Nazism."



Earlier today, jurors were read messages Davison had posted on online forums and heard he was prepared to "die fighting" for his cause.



Andrew Edis QC, prosecuting, said Davison wrote: "I know my aims.



"I don't care if I am fighting a unwinnable battle.



"I would rather die fighting than let the scum of the earth walk over us."



Davison wrote of "taking control of national white countries by any means necessary and overthrow and see the downfall of the ZOG".



The court heard yesterday that in June last year police discovered copies of The Poor Man's James Bond and The Anarchist's Cookbook on computers at the home Davison shared with his mother and younger brothers and sisters in County Durham.



Davison, of Grampian Way, Annfield Plain, denies three charges of possessing a record containing information useful in committing or preparing acts of terrorism.



Last month his father, of Myrtle Grove, Burnopfield, County Durham, admitted preparing for acts of terrorism and producing a chemical weapon from June 1 to 3 last year.



He also admitted three charges of possessing a record containing information likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing acts of terrorism relating to electronic copies of The Anarchist's Cookbook, the Mujahideen Explosives Handbook and Kitchen Complete on June 2.



He will be sentenced at the conclusion of his son's trial.



Ricin is a toxin that is extracted from the castor bean and exposure to small quantities can be fatal.



The US Centre for Disease Control suggests as little as 500 micrograms - about half a grain of sand - of the substance can be lethal if injected or inhaled. It has no known antidote.

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