Wolf of Shenfield Robin Clark shooting: Police arrest 51-year-old man on suspicion of conspiracy to commit murder

Mr Clark was shot in the leg by a gunman wearing a balaclava

Police investigating the shooting of the so-called “Wolf of Shenfield”, City trader Robin Clark, have arrested a 51-year-old man on suspicion of conspiracy to commit murder.

Mr Clark, 44, was shot in the car park at Shenfield station on 24 January, and had to spend several weeks in hospital before returning to work at brokerage firm RP Martin.

British Transport Police confirmed a man from Essex had been arrested in relation to the incident, and released on bail pending further inquiries.

The shooting victim previously told the Sun newspaper that he feared for his life in the attack, which saw him shot in the leg at point-blank range by a gunman wearing a balaclava at 5.55am.

Police have previously said they believe Mr Clark was deliberately targeted, though he told investigators he had “no idea why someone would want to hurt me like this”.

Speaking from his hospital last month, he told The Sun: “I said a quick prayer because I thought this was going to be the end. I thought I was going to bleed to death before any help would come.”

Nicknamed the Wolf of Shenfield as a homage to the Martin Scorsese film The Wolf of Wall Street, the City trader last year rented out his £2.2 million five-bedroom mansion in Ingatestone after running into debt.

A county court judgment was filed against him for debts of £14,653. The day before the shooting he tried to sell his luxury Range Rover car for £10,000.

A source close to him said the trader went through a difficult divorce and was saddled with debt.

Brokerage firm RP Martin has declined to comment on the incident. It is understood Mr Clark has returned to work as a derivatives trader in the City – and was subjected to a cruel prank by colleagues upon his return.

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