Britain may be as warm as Bondi Beach as fine spell continues

Temperatures could reach 20C as dry, sunny weather continues to next weekend

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The Independent Online

Britain could be as warm as Bondi Beach over the next few days as dry, sunny weather continues across the UK.

The mercury could hit 20C in London and the south east on Monday – the same as Sydney, Australia – with highs of 17C expected even in Scotland.

The Met Office is confident fine weather and above-average temperatures will continue until next weekend at least, as high pressure protects the UK from Atlantic weather fronts.

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Another couple enjoy the fine weather on Thurlestone Beach, Devon, on Saturday

There will be a lot of fine weather across the UK and definitely some good spells of sunshine for almost anywhere.

Meteorologist Nicola Willis

Meteorologist Nicola Willis said: “There will be a lot of fine weather across the UK and definitely some good spells of sunshine for almost anywhere.

“In this kind of set up the high pressure is dominant and blocks anything coming in from the Atlantic.

“It’s looking like hanging around at least to the end of the coming week.”

Clear skies will mean cold nights as temperatures drop as low as 6C to 7C in urban areas and 3C to 4C in rural spots.

Stronger winds in the west, from south west England up to western Scotland, with gusts of up to 35mph, will give a chilly edge at times.

Beaches, parks and beer gardens have been packed over the weekend as temperatures soared to 19C – about two degrees above average – on the south coast on Sunday.

Drivers faced five-mile queues to get into Bournemouth on Saturday as daytrippers flocked for the beach to enjoy the unseasonal weather.

But forecasters were reluctant to use the term ‘Indian summer’, which is normally reserved for temperatures 5C above average occurring after the first frost of autumn.

The rare coincidence of astronomical events, including a so-called ‘supermoon’, mean the astronomical tide will be at its highest for 19 years, with sea levels 50cm higher than normal  spring tides.

But the high pressure and settled weather should protect the UK from coastal flooding.

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