Dole claimants are back over million mark

Click to follow
The Independent Online

The number of unemployment benefit claims have gone over a million for the first time in eight years after a huge increase in dole queues, new figures show today.

The claimant count soared by 75,700 in November, the biggest monthly increase since the spring of 1991, taking the total to 1.07 million.

The overall number of unemployed people, including those not eligible for benefits, increased by 137,000 in the quarter to October to 1.86 million, the highest figure for more than a decade.

The grim figures were compounded by a big fall in job vacancies, down by 49,000 in the last three months to 562,000, the joint lowest on record.







The claimant count rate is now 3.3 per cent, up by 0.2 per cent from October and by 0.8 per cent over the year, while the total unemployment rate is 6 per cent, up by 0.7 per cent from 12 months ago.

Long-term unemployment, covering those out of work for more than a year, increased by 7,000 to 438,000 in the latest quarter, while unemployment among 18 to 24-year-olds rose by 55,000 to 597,000, the highest figure since 1995.

Manufacturing jobs continued to be lost, down by 73,000 in the three months to October compared with a year ago to 2.83 million, the lowest figure since comparable records began in 1978.

Today's data from the Office for National Statistics also showed a fall in the number of people in work, down by 115,000 in the quarter to October to 29.38 million.

The claimant count has now increased for 10 months in a row, the worst sequence since a run of 16 monthly rises from March 2005.

Average earnings increased by 3.3 per cent in the year to October, unchanged from the previous month.

Around 180,000 people were made redundant in the three months to October, an increase of 41,000 on the previous quarter and 49,000 over the year.



Today's figures showed the largest monthly increase in unemployment benefit claimants in Northern Ireland in almost 30 years.

The total rose by 3,100 to 34,100 in November, the biggest monthly rise since October 1980.

While the construction industry accounted for approximately one third of the increase, job losses have been more widely spread among other sectors this month. The number of unemployed last month was 34,100.



TUC general secretary Brendan Barber said: "These figures show the awful human cost of the financial crash feeding through into the real economy.

"The Government's number one priority must now be on getting these people back to work and ensuring they do not face financial devastation while on the dole.

"If ever there was a sign that we need a fundamentally different economic approach in the UK, this is it."

Paul Kenny, general secretary of the GMB union, said: "These figures reflect how many families face bleak prospects during Christmas and the New Year. Things will get a lot worse before they get better.

"As well as taking measures to restart their economies, Governments in the UK and elsewhere need to take steps to deal once and for all with the elements in the financial sector that visited this recession upon us.

"We can no longer tolerate a provisional wing of capitalism that was allowed to cock a snook at the standards of transparency, disclosure and accountability required of the official wing of the financial sector.

"Trading by the provisions wing in financial markets should be outlawed forthwith."



Unison general secretary Dave Prentis said: "This is more worrying news for the economy, but devastating for every individual who has lost a job. Many face a bleak Christmas.

"The immediate outlook doesn't look good either.

"The Government must use every weapon at its disposal, including public investment, to create and sustain jobs in all sectors."



Today's figures showed the largest monthly increase in unemployment benefit claimants in Northern Ireland in almost 30 years.

The total rose by 3,100 to 34,100 in November, the biggest monthly rise since October 1980.

While the construction industry accounted for approximately one third of the increase, job losses have been more widely spread among other sectors this month. The number of unemployed last month was 34,100.



TUC general secretary Brendan Barber said: "These figures show the awful human cost of the financial crash feeding through into the real economy.

"The Government's number one priority must now be on getting these people back to work and ensuring they do not face financial devastation while on the dole.

"If ever there was a sign that we need a fundamentally different economic approach in the UK, this is it."

Paul Kenny, general secretary of the GMB union, said: "These figures reflect how many families face bleak prospects during Christmas and the New Year. Things will get a lot worse before they get better.

"As well as taking measures to restart their economies, Governments in the UK and elsewhere need to take steps to deal once and for all with the elements in the financial sector that visited this recession upon us.

"We can no longer tolerate a provisional wing of capitalism that was allowed to cock a snook at the standards of transparency, disclosure and accountability required of the official wing of the financial sector.

"Trading by the provisions wing in financial markets should be outlawed forthwith."



Unison general secretary Dave Prentis said: "This is more worrying news for the economy, but devastating for every individual who has lost a job. Many face a bleak Christmas.

"The immediate outlook doesn't look good either.

"The Government must use every weapon at its disposal, including public investment, to create and sustain jobs in all sectors."



Unemployment in the regions between August and October was (tabulate under region, total unemployed, change on quarter, unemployment rate)

North East 104,000 plus 14,000 8.2 per cent
North West 243,000 plus 24,000 7.2 per cent
Yorkshire & the Humber 185,000 plus 22,000 7.0 per cent
East Midlands 127,000 minus 9,000 5.5 per cent
West Midlands 182,000 plus 17,000 6.9 per cent
East 136,000 minus 12,000 4.6 per cent
London 308,000 plus 32,000 7.6 per cent
South East 200,000 plus 6,000 4.5 per cent
South West 115,000 plus 8,000 4.3 per cent
Wales 94,000 plus 14,000 6.6 per cent
Scotland 134,000 plus 22,000 5.0 per cent
Northern Ireland 36,000 no change 4.3 per cent

Comments