Dutch-style bike lanes set for roll-out in Bristol - Britain’s cycling capital

A network of segregated cycle lanes will be created

In a bid to save lives and reduce the fear factor preventing people from taking to two wheels, Bristol is to announce radical new proposals which will make it Britain’s first city to adopt Dutch-style cycle lanes.

The plans, being announced later this year, will see a network of segregated cycle lanes created. Around 100 miles of cycle ways will be set aside for a “primary network” of major cycling routes, according to Martin McDonnell, secretary of the Bristol Cycling Campaign.

Attention will then turn to “secondary networks and then local networks” he added. “We want to bring cycling down to the level where everybody can cycle from their front door to wherever they want to get to.”

The group has worked with councillors to come up with the plan. In a statement, a spokesperson for Bristol City Council said: “We are producing a new cycling strategy with plans for a Strategic Cycle Network for the city, some of which would include segregated cycling routes.  We are aiming to consult on proposals later this year for a launch in Spring 2014.  There are currently more than £10m of new cycling measures in the Council’s cycling programme, including the new cycling ambition fund to improve cross city and river links.”

Bristol already has the highest number of cyclists of any city in the UK at an estimated 16,000. Mayor George Ferguson aims to double that figure by 2020. But whether in Bristol or elsewhere, making roads safer for cyclists is vital if numbers are to increase. The national picture is bleak, with the number of cyclists killed or injured on Britain’s roads at its highest in at least three years, with 118 deaths and 3,222 injuries recorded in 2012. The vast majority of victims were adults. Bristol’s new network will “encourage more people to cycle in a safe environment, with freedom from fear of motor traffic,” said Jon Usher, area manager for Sustrans.

And Martin Key, campaigns manager, British Cycling, commented: “It is great to see ambitious decisions being made on transforming the city into a Dutch-style cycling haven.” He added: “Cities such as New York and Seville have shown that building a network of segregated lanes leads to massive increases in cycling while also cutting congestion and collisions – now is the time for us to do the same.”

Cyclists are increasingly frustrated at sharing busy roads, and thousands staged a protest in London in September, demanding more road space. While Bristol is at the forefront in making more room for cyclists, similar moves are being looked at in London, Manchester, Birmingham, Cambridge, Leeds and Newcastle. And Dr Julian Huppert MP, chair of the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group, said: “Cambridge, like Bristol, has also decided to follow the Dutch model and build segregated cycle lanes. The Dutch have an enviable record of cycling and if we are to increase the take-up of cycling in this country we need to follow their example to make it safer by giving cyclists greater protection from motor vehicles and particularly HGVs.” Other places need to “follow Bristol’s lead” in putting “badly needed” infrastructure in place, supported by government funding, he added.

Transport Minister Robert Goodwill said: “Bristol has a good track record of delivering infrastructure for cyclists – indeed, the strong case it made to the Department led to it receiving a share of the £77m announced to boost cycling in eight English cities announced by the Prime Minister in the summer.”

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
News
people
News
Richard Blair is concerned the trenches are falling into disrepair
newsGeorge Orwell's son wants to save war site that inspired book
Life and Style
Audrey Hepburn with Hubert De Givenchy, whose well-cut black tuxedo is a 'timeless look'
fashionIt may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
Arts and Entertainment
The pair in their heyday in 1967
music
Life and Style
fashionFrom bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant / Resourcer

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitment Consu...

Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, AngularJS)

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, JavaScript, HTML...

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine