Everyman cinema faced with closure over losses

Britain's oldest independent cinema is facing closure, just months after a massive revamp. The Everyman, in Hampstead, north London, which opened in 1933, is up for sale after making a loss estimated at a quarter of a million pounds over the last seven months.

Britain's oldest independent cinema is facing closure, just months after a massive revamp. The Everyman, in Hampstead, north London, which opened in 1933, is up for sale after making a loss estimated at a quarter of a million pounds over the last seven months.

The owners, Pullman Cinemas, invested £800,000 on refurbishment earlier this year, and hope that the new owner will keep it going. Phillip Roberts, Pullman's accountant, said: "The board took the decision reluctantly, but felt that it had no alternative."

The actor Tom Conti, who lives in Hampstead, said: "It is the end of an era. I am very sad. You don't spend loads of money refurbishing a cinema, only to sell it off a few months later." The actress Helena Bonham Carter, another local, was also dismayed at the news. "I've been a big fan of the cinema over the years, it's a wonderful place. It would be a terrible shame to see it go."

The cinema's manager, Paul Roberts, said: "It would seem mad if someone didn't snap up the Everyman. It is a wonderful building in a great location with a marvellous history... Independent cinemas are vital for the vibrancy of the film industry."

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