Memorial planned to honour Ulster dead

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The Independent Online

The government is drawing up plans for a memorial to honour soldiers, police and other public servants killed during the conflict in Northern Ireland, Tony Blair said yesterday.

The government is drawing up plans for a memorial to honour soldiers, police and other public servants killed during the conflict in Northern Ireland, Tony Blair said yesterday.

The Prime Minister said he was "sympathetic" to the erection of a memorial because the bravery of such people " was absolutely outstanding" throughout the Troubles.

He was challenged about the issue by William Hague, the Tory leader, during question time. Earlier, Iain Duncan Smith, the Tory defence spokesman, and Andrew Mackay, the spokesman on Northern Ireland, called on the Government to agree to two monuments, in London and Ulster, dedicated to those who lost their lives in the service of the Crown and funded by public subscription.

Mr Hague said: "Can I ask you to confirm that the Government will support our call today for a permanent memorial in London and in Northern Ireland as a fitting tribute to those members of the armed forces and the RUC who have died defending the whole of the UK from terrorism over the last 30 years."

Mr Blair replied: "We are sympathetic to that, which is why it was announced earlier that we were looking at the prospect of putting up a memorial to those officers that have died and soldiers as well, because their bravery was absolutely outstanding throughout... the Troubles."

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