Report highlights struggle of disabled people

Many disabled people in Britain are living socially isolated, cash-strapped lives and struggle to participate in normal activities, a new report indicated today.







The bleak findings revealed that disproportionately high numbers of disabled adults said they had limited engagement in leisure, social and cultural activities, social contact, learning opportunities and paid work.



They also suffered restrictions in using transport, affording expenses or loan repayments, accessing rooms in their home and buildings outside their home.



More than a quarter of adults (26%) were identified as having some kind of disability, according to the Life Opportunities Survey Interim Report published by the Office for National Statistics.



Some 29% were classed as having an impairment of some sort.



The report paints a grim picture of large numbers of disabled people being riddled with so much anxiety and lack of confidence that they struggle to lead a normal life.



Such feelings of uncertainty were found to be the second most common barrier to employment, with 19% of adults with impairments citing them as an impediment in relation to the type or amount of work they did.



These feelings affected the type or amount of work done by only 4% of adults without impairments.



Feeling insecure also stopped many adults with impairments from using long-distance buses and long-distance trains, with that acting as a barrier to 13% and 12% of them respectively.



This compared to 3% and 2% respectively among those without impairments.



More than half of adults (56%) with impairments experienced restrictions in the type or amount of paid work they did, compared with 26% of those without impairments.



Almost half of households where at least one person had an impairment (45%) were unable to afford expenses or make loan repayments.



This compares with 29% of households where no-one has an impairment.



The vast majority of adults with impairments (83%) had limited participation in leisure, social and cultural activities and almost a quarter (24%) had limited social contact.



Financial reasons were behind several problems faced by adults with impairments, including barriers to learning and going on holiday.



Some 32% of households where at least one person had an impairment could not afford to pay for a week's annual break away from home, compared with 20% of households where no-one had an impairment.



Buildings such as shops and hospitals were found to be harder to access for those with impairments, posing problems for 29% of them, compared to just 7% for those without.



Employment opportunities were also more limited for those with impairments than for other people, but reduced working hours helped them overcome this, according to the findings.



Tax credits also helped improve employment opportunities for them, the report found.



Impairments were defined as the loss of physiological and psychological functions of the body, such as loss of sight, hearing, mobility of learning capacity.

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant / Resourcer

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitment Consu...

Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, AngularJS)

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, JavaScript, HTML...

Day In a Page

Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?