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Royal baby: Uncle (Prince) Harry says he'll make sure Prince George 'has fun' - is that a threat or a promise?


Prince Harry has said that his role in the upbringing of his nephew, the royal baby Prince George, will be to “make sure he has fun”.

The 28-year-old said he had already met and had a chance to hold the new addition to the royal family, and warned Prince William: “I only hope my brother knows how expensive my baby sitting charges are.”

Harry was in a jokey mood, and could not stop smiling as he made an appearance at a photographic exhibition in London.

Unsurprisingly he had to field a number of questions about the new prince, and said that his mission was: “To make sure he has a good upbringing, and keep him out of harm's way and to make sure he has fun.

“The rest I'll leave to the parents,” he said.

The Prince had spent around half an hour viewing the exhibition Sentebale - Stories of Hope at the Getty Images Gallery in central London.

Some of the pictures were taken in February during the royal's trip to the southern African kingdom of Lesotho, where his charity supports a range of projects that help disadvantaged children and young people.

Among the guests was David Furnish, whose partner Sir Elton John has helped raise money for a new Sentebale children's centre through the Elton John Aids Foundation's White Tie and Tiara ball.

Mr Furnish said: ”I congratulated him on being an uncle and he smiled proudly. I'm an uncle many times over and I love it.“

Sir Elton is currently in the South of France, recovering from a bout of appendicitis before surgery to remove his appendix.

Other guests included the BBC newsreader Kate Silverton, who has seen the poverty of Lesotho first hand when she filmed a report there.

The Prince, wearing a blue suit and a white open-necked shirt, told an audience of 140 invited guests that he would not make a long speech because it was ”absolutely roasting“ in the small gallery off Oxford Street.

He said of the charity's work: ”In the absence of parents for the vast majority of Lesotho children we at Sentebale we hope are filling the gap as best we can.

“The stigma that surrounds HIV and Aids must be explained and, I hope, understood.”

Additional reporting by Press Association