Two-thirds work past retirement age

More than two-thirds of adults plan to work on past the state pension age in a bid to improve their finances, research showed today.

Around 68% of people do not think they will stop working when they can draw their state pension, with 10% saying they do not think they will ever fully retire, according to insurer Aviva.

Just under a third of people think they will continue working until they are aged between 65 and 70, while 12% plan to work on beyond this age.

Around 61% of people who plan to delay retirement say they would like to be self-employed, while 44% would like to work in retail and 27% claim they would opt for something in the leisure or hospitality industry.

The group has dubbed the trend part-tirement, and said the chance to work for themselves would give people freedom and flexibility.

Unsurprisingly, the main force motivating people to continue working is financial security, with 60% saying they would delay retirement in order to boost their financial position.

But 54% said they would continue in employment to keep themselves from getting under their partner's feet, with others saying they wanted to keep their mind active, or that they wanted to continue interacting with other people.

Four out of 10 people aged over 55 said they would continue working for their current employer once they passed the official retirement age, a quarter of whom would work part-time.

But 5% of those questioned said they would not be able to continue in the same job due to the enforced retirement date at their current workplace.

Clive Bolton, at-retirement director for Aviva Life, said: "Government proposals mean that the state retirement age is set to increase over the next few years, but it appears that many UK adults already see themselves working well past the traditional retirement age.

"While increasing financial security is a major factor behind many people working, there are also significant emotional, social and intellectual benefits."

:: Wriglesworth Research questioned 1,400 people aged over 55 and 1,200 aged under 55 during April.