UPS faces air cargo screening ban

The parcel company at the centre of a UK bomb incident last year has been barred by the Government from screening air cargo at some UK sites for security reasons, it was announced today.







Confirmation of the UPS situation was made by the Department for Transport (DfT).



The DfT said: "The safety of the travelling public is paramount and our security regime is kept under constant review.



"We can confirm that, following careful consideration, the department has restricted the number of sites in the UK at which UPS Ltd are permitted to screen air cargo until it has satisfied current security requirements. For obvious security reasons we will not comment on the details."



New security measures affecting the transfer of cargo through the UK came into force at the beginning of November last year following the discovery at East Midlands airport of an explosive device hidden in a printer cartridge on a UPS aircraft.



A device was also found on an aircraft in Dubai.



The bomb at East Midlands was removed by Leicestershire Police officers shortly after 3.30am on October 29 after a tip-off from Saudi intelligence.



It had travelled through a UPS hub at Germany's Cologne Airport before being detected in the UK after the tip-off.



It later emerged that the explosives discovered at East Midlands and in Dubai were at least 50 times more potent than would be needed to blow a hole in an aircraft fuselage.



After last year's incidents, Home Secretary Theresa May said the East Midlands and Dubai bombs originated in Yemen and were believed to be the work of al Qaida.



She announced that all flights containing unaccompanied freight from Somalia would be suspended. Unaccompanied air freight from Yemen had already been suspended earlier last year.



Also, ink cartridges of more than 500g were banned from hand baggage on flights departing from the UK and also on cargo flights unless they originated from a regular shipper with security arrangements approved by the DfT.









A UPS spokesman told the BBC website: "As part of a scheduled review by the DfT of UPS procedures and employment documentation related to security, the DfT identified areas of concern that UPS now is working to address.

"Some facilities have been temporarily taken offline, which in some cases has led to delays in the movement of packages. UPS has activated contingency plans, communicated with customers and expects service levels to return to normal early next week."



He went on: "The DfT reviews have been helpful, educating UPS on the expectations of DfT auditors.



"UPS continues to assess the operation of its UK network and, in co-operation with the DfT, may refine it to ensure an even more efficient level of service to its customers."















Later, a UPS spokeswoman said: "Security is a shared responsibility requiring a partnership between private enterprise and governmental authorities around the world.

"UPS routinely works with all the appropriate agencies and authorities around the world, including the UK's Department for Transport, to ensure the safety of its network."



She went on: "A Dft scheduled review identified areas of concern UPS is working to address. As a result, some facilities in the UK have been temporarily taken offline, which in some cases has led to delays in the movement of packages.



"UPS has activated contingency plans, communicated with customers and expects service levels to return to normal early next week.



"In cooperation with the DfT, UPS continues to assess the operation of its UK network to ensure full compliance with EU and UK security requirements, leading to a higher level of service to its customers.



"We cannot reveal any specific details about our security procedures as this would be counter-productive to their effectiveness.



"We continue to work with all agencies around the world to maintain and enhance security and to balance necessary protections with the free flow of commerce, just as we have always done."

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Electrician - Full Time Employed

£29000 - £37500 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Due to expansion and increased ...

Tradewind Recruitment: Permanent Class Teachers Required for 2015/2016 - Suffolk

£21000 - £50000 per annum: Tradewind Recruitment: Class Teachers seeking perma...

Tradewind Recruitment: Year 5 Teacher Required For 2015/16 - Chelmsford

£20000 - £40000 per annum: Tradewind Recruitment: A popular, 'Good' school loc...

Tradewind Recruitment: Class Teachers Required in Norwich and Great Yarmouth

£20000 - £45000 per annum: Tradewind Recruitment: I am working on behalf of a ...

Day In a Page

Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

Solved after 200 years

The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

Sunken sub

Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

Age of the selfie

Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

Not so square

How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

Still carrying the torch

The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

...but history suggests otherwise
The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

The bald truth

How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

Tour de France 2015

Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

A new beginning for supersonic flight?

Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash
I would never quit Labour, says Liz Kendall

I would never quit party, says Liz Kendall

Latest on the Labour leadership contest
Froome seals second Tour de France victory

Never mind Pinot, it’s bubbly for Froome

Second Tour de France victory all but sealed
Oh really? How the 'lowest form of wit' makes people brighter and more creative

The uses of sarcasm

'Lowest form of wit' actually makes people brighter and more creative
A magazine editor with no vanity, and lots of flair

No vanity, but lots of flair

A tribute to the magazine editor Ingrid Sischy
Foraging: How the British rediscovered their taste for chasing after wild food

In praise of foraging

How the British rediscovered their taste for wild food