Wrexham river deaths couple were earlier seen walking their dogs, police say

 

A young couple found dead in an a swollen river in North Wales were earlier seen walking their dogs, police said today.

The bodies of Alicia Williams, 27, and David Platt, 25, were found in the swollen River Clywedog just outside Wrexham, near Felin Puleston, yesterday.

The body of Alicia Williams was spotted by a member of the public on a sandbank at around 5pm yesterday and David Platt was found at around midnight.

Police said today they had found no evidence that the pair died trying to rescue their dog.

The grim discovery came as flood warnings remained in place across Britain after the worst September storm for 30 years.

Heavy rain over the past three days has caused flooding throughout North Wales.

Downpours across the country have flooded hundreds of homes and swollen rivers causing chaos on road and rail networks and flooding hundreds of homes and businesses.

This morning 44 flood warnings remained in place, along with 64 less serious flood alerts. The majority of the warnings are are in place in Northern England.

Today thousands of people face further flooding misery despite the worst of the rain being over.

The Environment Agency said around 570 homes and businesses have been flooded across England and Wales since Sunday.

In the York and Selby areas soldiers were deployed overnight to assist with a sandbagging operation in the village of Cawood, while a fire crew from Lincolnshire was brought in with high-volume pumping equipment.

The peak flow of the River Ouse in York today was around 16ft higher than the summer average - the river has also recorded its highest ever level, and is thought likely to remain high for another 24 hours.

The Highways Agency said today that a small section of the A1 remained closed in the Catterick Area.

The Met Office said the storm was the result of the unusual position of the jet stream - a high-altitude band of wind which steers weather systems and caused heavy rain and floods in the summer when it shifted further south than normal.

Forecasters said the flood warnings remain in place because of the possibility that rainfall from recent days may be flowing through the river systems, but that the worst of the rain had passed.

Some areas of the UK have seen more than 4in (100mm) of rain in the past few days. Ravensworth in North Yorkshire has seen the heaviest rainfall, receiving 131mm (5.2in) since Sunday.

A number of other places have received more than 4in (100mm) and Rhyl, in North Wales, has had 3.8in (97.2mm) since Sunday, well above the average total for September in the area.

Despite the easing of the weather authorities are warning communities to remain alert to the possibility of flooding.

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Key Sales Account Manager - OTE £35,000

£25000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Have you got a proven track rec...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive - OTE £40,000

£15000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is a great opportunity for...

Recruitment Genius: Senior Designer / Design Director

£38000 - £48000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This B2B content marketing agen...

Austen Lloyd: Law Costs HOD - Southampton

£50000 - £60000 per annum + Excellent Salary: Austen Lloyd: An outstanding new...

Day In a Page

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn