Law Report: Maastricht Treaty may be ratified: Regina v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Ex parte Rees-Mogg - Queen's Bench Divisional Court (Lord Justice Lloyd, Lord Justice Mann and Mr Justice Auld), 30 July 1993

The United Kingdom may lawfully ratify the Treaty on European Union signed at Maastricht on 7 February 1992.

The Divisional Court dismissed Lord Rees-Mogg's application for judicial review of the Foreign Secretary's decision to ratify the Maastricht Treaty.

The first argument was that by ratifying the Protocol on Social Policy, the United Kingdom would be in breach of section 6 of the European Parliamentary Act 1978, which provides that treaties which increase the powers of the European Parliament must be approved by an Act of Parliament, since the European Communities (Amendment) Act 1993 which by section 1(2) approves the Maastricht Treaty specifically excludes in section 1(1) the Protocol on Social Policy.

The second argument was that by ratifying the Protocol, the Government would be altering Community law under the Treaty of Rome without Parliamentary approval, in breach of section 2(1) of the European Communities Act 1972 which it was argued curtailed the prerogative power to amend or add to the Treaty of Rome.

The third argument was that by ratifying Title V of the Treaty, which establishes a common foreign and security policy among member states, the Government would be transferring part of the Royal Prerogative, to community institutions without statutory authority.

David Pannick QC, Keith Lindblom, Rhodri Thompson and Jeremy Callman (Gouldens) for Lord Rees-Mogg; Sydney Kentridge QC, Stephen Richards and David Anderson (Treasury Solicitor) for the Foreign Secretary.

LORD JUSTICE LLOYD, giving the court's judgment, said that the case did not question proceedings in Parliament or impeach its privileges in any way. It was concerned with legality of government actions and intention. Its issues were clearly within the proper sphere of judicial review, as questions of policy were within the sphere of Parliament. The questions raised were of great moment, but it was an exaggeration to describe the case as the most important constitutional case for 300 years.

The court would hesitate before holding the Protocols were not intended to be part of the Maastricht Treaty. The Protocols were ancillary or incidental or supplementary to the Treaty and ratification of the Treaty would automatically involve ratification of the Protocols.

The purposes of section 1(1) and section 1(2) of the 1993 Act were quite different. The purpose of section 1(1) was to incorporate certain parts of the Maastricht Treaty in English domestic law. The purpose of section 1(2) was to ensure that the Treaty as a whole, including the Protocols, could be ratified by the UK without breach of the 1978 Act. Treaty in section 1(2) included all the Titles, all the Protocols and all the Declarations. The first argument must be rejected.

Turning to the second issue, when Parliament wished to fetter the Crown's treaty-making power, it did so in express terms, such as in section 6 of the 1978 Act. If the Crown's treaty making power in relation to Community law were impliedly excluded by section 2(1) of the 1972 Act, section 6 of the 1978 Act would not have been necessary. The Protocol on Social Policy was not intended to apply to the UK. The Protocol was not one of the treaties covered under section 2(1) of the 1972 Act by which Community treaties had force in domestic law. The UK's obligation under the Protocol was on the international plane, not the domestic plane. The second argument was rejected.

The third and last argument was the most interesting jurisprudentially but also the weakest. Assuming the court had jurisdiction to consider the questions raised and assuming the Government could not lawfully transfer any part of the Crown's prerogative powers in relation to foreign affairs without statutory enactment, Title V could not be regarded as a transfer of prerogative powers.

Title V did not entail an abandonment or transfer of prerogative powers but an exercise of those powers. No one had ever suggested that the Charter of the United Nations or of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisations involved a transfer of prerogative powers. Title V should be read in the same light. The third argument was rejected.

Ying Hui Tan, Barrister

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Key Sales Account Manager - OTE £35,000

£25000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Have you got a proven track rec...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive - OTE £40,000

£15000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is a great opportunity for...

Recruitment Genius: Senior Designer / Design Director

£38000 - £48000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This B2B content marketing agen...

Austen Lloyd: Law Costs HOD - Southampton

£50000 - £60000 per annum + Excellent Salary: Austen Lloyd: An outstanding new...

Day In a Page

Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn