Axe-wielding ministers earn Star Chamber seats

Five Cabinet ministers agreed yesterday to cut their budgets by about a third as the Treasury axe began to fall ahead of next month's government-wide spending cuts. Eric Pickles, the Communities Secretary, and Caroline Spelman, the Environment Secretary, were rewarded with seats on the Cabinet's Star Chamber, which will impose cuts on those ministers who cannot reach agreement with the Treasury. Both ministers have also been quick to cull quangos since the May election.

Mr Pickles may emerge as a key figure on the cabinet committee, chaired by the Chancellor, George Osborne, in pressing other ministers to fall into line. "He's a bruiser and the Treasury is delighted to get him on board," one insider said last night.

The ministers already serving on the Star Chamber, who have relatively small budgets, have also reached a provisional settlement on their departmental spending for four years. They are William Hague, the Foreign Secretary; Francis Maude and Oliver Letwin at the Cabinet Office; and the Chancellor and Danny Alexander, the Liberal Democrat Chief Treasury Secretary.

The scale of the cuts being planned was also underlined last night by a leaked Cabinet Office document listing 177 taxpayer-funded bodies which face abolition in a "bonfire of the quangos".

The hit-list is said to include the Health Protection Agency, which provides advice on infectious diseases and environmental hazards, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and the Commission for Rural Communities. Four more bodies will be privatised and 129 merged. Another 94 – including the BBC World Service, the Design Council and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission – are under threat.

The first Whitehall budget deals were announced after the public spending committee met for just over two hours yesterday. Mr Pickles has reached an outline agreement on cutting his £4.4bn budget for housing and regeneration but is still in talks with the Treasury over the other element – the £26.3bn grants to local authorities. No deals on capital spending on building projects have yet been struck with any departments. Precise figures for each ministry will be announced by the Chancellor on 20 October.

The Treasury had expected Kenneth Clarke, the Justice Secretary and former chancellor, to be among the first ministers to settle, winning a seat at the top table. "He's not going to make rash decisions to fall for that trick," one ally said. Mr Clarke, who has a budget of £9.4bn, is believed to be ready to shave spending on legal aid and the probation service, but Tories are nervous about plans to curb the prison population via sentencing reform. Allies say he will not scrap short jail terms.

The biggest headache may be at the Department for Business, where the Lib Dem Vince Cable has been asked by the Treasury to offer more cuts. The Business Secretary worries that axeing schemes that help industry will weaken growth as the country emerges from recession.

About half his £19.6bn budget goes on universities. There is tension between the Tories and Lib Dems over funding them, with the former leaning towards higher top-up fees and the latter favouring graduate tax. Mr Cable is expected to be one of the last ministers to reach agreement. Another problem is Defence, in its first strategic review since 1998. Liam Fox, the Defence Secretary, is due to discuss the options for reducing a £40.4bn budget next Tuesday at a National Security Council meeting chaired by David Cameron.

Theresa May, the Home Secretary, is under pressure to make politically sensitive cuts in the police budget. Iain Duncan Smith, the Work and Pensions Secretary, is battling with Mr Osborne over the benefit system. The Health and International Development budgets will rise in real terms each year.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Learning Support Assistant

£65 - £70 per day: Randstad Education Cardiff: Due to the continual growth and...

Learning Support Assistant - Newport

£65 - £70 per day: Randstad Education Cardiff: Due to the continual growth and...

Operations Manager

competitive: Progressive Recruitment: I am currently recruiting for an Operati...

Project Coordinator/Order Entry, Security Cleared

£100 - £110 per day + competitive: Orgtel: Project Coordinator/Order Entry Ham...

Day In a Page

Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
5 best waterproof cameras

Splash and flash: 5 best waterproof cameras

Don't let water stop you taking snaps with one of these machines that will take you from the sand to meters deep
Louis van Gaal interview: Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era

Louis van Gaal interview

Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era
Will Gore: The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series

Will Gore: Outside Edge

The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz